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Road Kill Deer - Would you or wouldn't you?
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mihto



Joined: 03 Feb 2008
Posts: 3273
Location: West coast of Norway
PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 10 8:59 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Our regulations are a bit different from yours and here is my opinion/experience on deer roadkill:

Our police would immediately get involved and a municipal hunter would be put in charge. If there is an injury a tracking dog would be part of the hunting party.

If the deer is dead it would be taken away immediately. No lying around.

If a vet was called to put it down the medication would be a concentrated barbiturate. Not dangerous to the touch but very dangerous to eat. The vet would not leave the place until the carcass was taken away. More likely, however, would be a slaughtering process where the meat would be edible if treated right, depending on the injury. The animal will then be used by the municipality, mostly in old people's homes

Under normal slaughter procedure an animal is bled within a minute after being stunned and the stomachs are taken out within 45 minutes thereafter. Eating meat which has not been bled and with the stomachs inside for much longer is not advisable because the risk of spreading harmful bacteria.

I would gladly eat a roadkill if the animal had been put down properly. If it was found dead, even if still warm, I would never touch it.

matt_hooks



Joined: 01 Aug 2010
Posts: 312
Location: Lambourn(ish) Berkshire
PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 10 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That would be the ideal here too Mihto, unfortunately it doesn't always happen, and as the drugs are so dangerous if ingested, I'd not risk it unless I had seen the deer hit, and probably dispatched it myself!

It is completely illegal for roadkill deer to enter the food chain in this country. You'd be ok eating it yourself, but if it came up for sale, or even if you gave it away, you'd be leaving yourself open to prosecution!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36271
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 10 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the bacteria problem is zero in stew unless the thing is "soupy" and laden with bacterial toxins

a large dose of barbs could be an issue

humans are very able to eat carrion

herbivore gut contents do not produce fatal results if spread on fresh meat

i would not be able to post this if they did

a sort ,a good wash and a long boil will be fine

mihto



Joined: 03 Feb 2008
Posts: 3273
Location: West coast of Norway
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 10 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ahhh......here comes a nice one.

A dead hare was found at the side of the road, still warm. Two people in a car saw it, took it home, skinned and cleaned it and put it into the freezer for later consumption.

Two weeks later both became very ill. A test showed an infection with Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia.

This disease is part of biological warfare.

Morale of the story: not everything dead at the side of the road has been killed by a car

Jenna



Joined: 30 Sep 2005
Posts: 263
Location: Away with the fairies
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 10 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Next door neighbour will take 'fresh' Roe - one killed by 'front end impact' on 'our' bit of road between 6 and 7am (body wasn't there when I took my dogs out but had 'appeared' by the time I went out for the bus) was in his freezer by the time I came home from work
Mostly roadkill Roe are 'flat stanley' by the time anyone thinks of removing them from the road hereabouts.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5545
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 10 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've had a stewed roadkill raccoon. Fairly tasty.

Geoff



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 215

PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 10 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    




12Bore



Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 9088
Location: Paddling in the Mersey
PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 10 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We'll be round for tea later!

Geoff



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 215

PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 10 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

12Bore wrote:
We'll be round for tea later!


All gone I'm afraid. This was from last year. Two of them right next to each other. Must have done some serious damage to somebodys car. The bigger one took the brunt of the hit, and about a quarter of the meat had to be discarded. The smaller one was felled by a broken-off foot (you can see in the first picture). The whole of this carcass was usable, including the offal.

wishus



Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 769
Location: Northampton, East Midlands
PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 10 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I know someone who saw a deer get run over and left. He decided to stop a few minutes later, turned round and picked the body up - definitely dead.

He took it home to carve up and the flesh in the chest was green! Possibly gangrene?

Anyway, he decided not to eat it.

Brownbear



Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 14929
Location: South West
PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 10 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wishus wrote:
I know someone who saw a deer get run over and left. He decided to stop a few minutes later, turned round and picked the body up - definitely dead.

He took it home to carve up and the flesh in the chest was green! Possibly gangrene?

Anyway, he decided not to eat it.


Liquid grass/acid mixture from the stomach bursting open, dyeing the flesh green.

Geoff



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 215

PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 10 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    



Just found, head took most of the impact and has been removed. Can anyone say for sure what species it is? Roe are usually more brown/orange. Sika?

kirstyfern



Joined: 03 Jan 2010
Posts: 1574
Location: Great Dunmow, Essex
PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 10 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw a herd this colour whilst hunting last winter, couldn't get camera out as was canteering down the track! I thought they were unusual but then forgot about it until you posted this....

Geoff



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 215

PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 10 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

kirstyfern wrote:
I saw a herd this colour whilst hunting last winter, couldn't get camera out as was canteering down the track! I thought they were unusual but then forgot about it until you posted this....


http://www.ashdownforest.org/conservation/deer.php

Quote:

Sika were introduced from (probably) Japan. They are more similar to red deer than fallow, despite their appearance, and there are concerns about hybridisation where the two species occur together. On the Forest, sika occur mainly near to Forest Row, where an ornamental herd escaped over twenty years ago. The animals that exist today cannot be the same ones that escaped originally but the herd has not increased to more than twenty animals nor has it spread very far.


This one was about 4 miles southeast of Forest Row. A bit bizarre that twenty years after escaping they have only managed to travel a few miles.

matt_hooks



Joined: 01 Aug 2010
Posts: 312
Location: Lambourn(ish) Berkshire
PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 10 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's difficult to identify it without a section, possibly a spoor print, information on where it lived etc. etc. etc.

Only kidding.

Pretty sure it's a Sika. The head would have been the giveaway. The lack of the dorsal line is a huge hint that differentiates Sika from Fallow.

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