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Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 6:59 am    Post subject: Pollack Reply with quote
    

Deep-fried, pan-fried, breaded, salt-crusted, in soup........it's always tasteless mush.

The oft-repeated assertion by a certain well known celebrity chef that Pollack is just as good as Cod is, in my experience, codswallop (do you see what I did there).

Has anyone got any tips for making Pollack taste good!?

marigold



Joined: 02 Sep 2005
Posts: 12458
Location: West Sussex
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Buy coley instead.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Pollack tastes fine, and cod isn't exactly a fish bursting with taste. You can always send any unwanted Pollack to me though.

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

marigold wrote:
Buy coley instead.


I catch my own, and am wondering if this is part of the problem - they're too fresh! Maybe 10 days in the hold of a trawler lets flavour 'develop'. I think Dover Sole is similar. Maybe I'll just let the remaining fillets sit in the fridge for a few days........

Rob R wrote:
Pollack tastes fine, and cod isn't exactly a fish bursting with taste. You can always send any unwanted Pollack to me though.


Cod is distinctly different, tho', better IMHO. Tho maybe if I post Pollack to York it'll taste of something by the time it gets there!

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I'm willing to test that theory

darkbrowneggs



Joined: 14 Jul 2010
Posts: 663
Location: Worcestershire
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

My mother and grandmother knew their "fish" and my mother would always complain if the fish was "too fresh" But it probably depends on which fish. ie I don't think you could have mackerel too fresh

I am nowhere near a supply of fresh fish now, and buy Lidl's Frozen Pollack and my mother always says "this fish is lovely - really tasty"

Heres a little Linky about cooking pollack

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8842
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i love pollack - for its subtle flavour and lovely texture. dont batter it.. just fry it.

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

darkbrowneggs wrote:
My mother and grandmother knew their "fish" and my mother would always complain if the fish was "too fresh" But it probably depends on which fish. ie I don't think you could have mackerel too fresh

I am nowhere near a supply of fresh fish now, and buy Lidl's Frozen Pollack and my mother always says "this fish is lovely - really tasty"

Heres a little Linky about cooking pollack


The Lidl frozen pollack (and a lot that you can buy frozen) is Alaskan Pollack, a different species. Often in fish fingers these days.

LynneA



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 4893
Location: London N21
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Cooked pollack last night to make a deconstructed fish pie.

Poached it in a splash of milk & butter, with dill, garlic & black pepper. Also added chopped onions & prawns. Put on plate & topped with cheesy garlicky Potato Dauphois, with peas on the side.

Cat spent most of the night sniffing the air and looking for dropped bits.

darkbrowneggs



Joined: 14 Jul 2010
Posts: 663
Location: Worcestershire
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That's interesting.

When I replied I wrote Pollock, then changed the spelling to match yours, as I thought I had got it wrong

Premumably Pollack is something different?

This is what Wikiwhatsit says about Pollock
Alaska pollock or walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) is a North Pacific species of the cod family Gadidae. While related to the common Atlantic pollock species of the same family, the Alaska pollock is not a member of the same Pollachius genus.

The Norwegian pollock (Theragra finnmarchica), a rare fish of Norwegian waters, may actually be the same species as the Alaska pollock.


Edited to say
Poached it in a splash of milk & butter, with dill, garlic & black pepper. Also added chopped onions & prawns. Put on plate & topped with cheesy garlicky Potato Dauphois, with peas on the side. - That looks delicious Lynnea

Last edited by darkbrowneggs on Sat Aug 20, 11 11:18 am; edited 1 time in total

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8842
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

oh I'm talking about pollock.. not pollack....

Northern Boy



Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 976

PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Pollock and Pollack are generally used interchangably, although I think the Alaskan stuff is usually called Pollock (and tastes better), whereas the Atlantic fish is usually Pollack.

The only way to be sure what you're eating is to include the scientific name. Or to taste them both - the mushy one is the Atlantic fish!

Stewy



Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Posts: 1453
Location: Berkshire
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 11 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We had the Lidl fish fingers the other night for tea and they were very nice as far as fish fingers go, I knew they were pollack but didn't know they were of the Alaskan variety.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23956
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 11 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Pollack is nice enough, but it is never going to set the taste buds alight, to be honest cod,pollack,coley,pouting, haddock etc. all taste pretty similar IMHO.

EDIT: out of interest what rig do you use to catch them?

Monki magic



Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 161
Location: Stockport
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 11 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I was catching pollock by by the bucket load last week in Looe. I only kept a few of the bigger ones and threw the rest back. I cooked them as breaded goujons and they are very tasty.

I was using live sandeel +-1hour of high tide off the rocks. Really after Bass but no luck.

Although a fishing trip did yeald a great Ling which some was eaten and the rest (about 8 fillets) now frozen.

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