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Dock leaves
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Luath



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 761

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 12 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That's my view; in an emergency/shortage of other greenery - maybe, but would have to be quite desperate I think

Mithril



Joined: 22 Jul 2011
Posts: 1755
Location: wessex
PostPosted: Wed May 09, 12 9:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Dock leaves Reply with quote
    

Mary-Jane wrote:
Green Rosie wrote:
Anyone on here eaten them? Link to recipe:

https://www.eatweeds.co.uk/dock-rice-feta-seaweed-parcels[/i]


Certainly not. I spend half my life digging the wretched things out of my kitchen garden

Me too! They seem to love my garden

Ipso-phyto



Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

With regards poisonous docks...

The bistort in dock pudding is a dock (Rumex genus), and yes the genus does contain oxalix acid, which in large amounts is harmful because it crsytalises and can potentially lead to kidney stones and / or gout.

Think of the taste of another dock- Sorrel, and you are familiar with the taste of oxalic acid.

To say docks are poisonous is, well, to be frank a little lazy intellectually.

Cabbages, and their relatives are amazing health foods with compounds currently under investigation for their anti cancer properties, yet poisonous when eaten in excess as they lead to thyroid problems.

Indeed i referf to the mediaeval alchemist Paracelcus(spelling?), who rightly stated it depends only on the dose whether something is poisonous or not.

The docks are in the Polygoonaceae family, as are buckwheat and rhubarb. The latter plant contains oxalic acid also, but no-one ever goes on about their popular leaf stems being
poisonous...
Personally, I feel a plant only consumed for a while during the year is not going to do me much harm...

The polygonaceae family is a completely edible family as far as i am aware, also containing japanese knotweed which, you guessed it, also contains oxalic acid.
The family was known as smartweeds by the american settlers because they also contain chrysophonic acid on their leaves which is known to numb the tongue somewhat, and the plants are best washed first to alleviate this.
I think in an age of google, wiki, et al and with information at our fingertips and coming out of our ears, we could at least be moving away from reactionary remarks about the properties of plants...i live in hope

Green Rosie



Joined: 13 May 2007
Posts: 10498
Location: Calvados, France
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Ipso-phyto wrote:
With regards poisonous docks...

... I think in an age of google, wiki, et al and with information at our fingertips and coming out of our ears, we could at least be moving away from reactionary remarks about the properties of plants...i live in hope


I think if you read the thread again you will see that nobody was making reactionary remarks (except perhaps MJ who was referring to it's properties as an annoying garden weed rather than a supper dish.) Everyone else seemed to agree that yes, it is edible although possibly poisonous if eaten to excess and there were in fact other nicer things to consume if given the choice.

I simply asked if anyone had ever eaten it and the answer appears to be no.

Thank you however for your detailed answer

wildfoodie



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 2169

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I've eaten dock before, the spring leaves soaked in brine for 3 days then rinsed fine chopped and used to stuff fish with. Also the seeds winnowed dry roasted and ground.

Finsky



Joined: 10 Sep 2011
Posts: 847
Location: Notts.
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

wildfoodie wrote:
I've eaten dock before, the spring leaves soaked in brine for 3 days then rinsed fine chopped and used to stuff fish with. Also the seeds winnowed dry roasted and ground.


Well?...how was it...nice?

wildfoodie



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 2169

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

salty and somewhat lemony. just what you need with fish. Tellingly, I only made it the once.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 42142
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 12 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That seems fair enough. Three days faffing about to achieve the effects of five minutes with a lemon and a salt cellar doesn't seem like a wise use of time for anybody.

Luath



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 761

PostPosted: Fri May 11, 12 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

No-one said docks were poisonous. Regarding rhubarb stems - accepted wisdom is not to eat them after June ( roughly when the goosberries are ripe and ready, so they take over from the rhubarb in the fruit calendar), as the oxalic acid starts to accumulate in the stems from the leaves - that's how I've always understood it and what I go by. For me, poisonous is not necessarily drop-down-dead posionous - there are degrees from mild to severe to deadly.

Ipso-phyto



Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri May 11, 12 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Fair play green rosie, I must watch myself posting late at night...hmmm !

I was trying to put over the point that the word poisonous is bandied around too much with regards potential toxicity of a given plant and can scare off people from experimenting(some may think thats a good idea!)

Because the docks are similar looking, I couldnt tell you which one I have tried(though probably Rumex crispus)
But taken when baby-sized, some are quite nice raw, with a hint of the oxalic acid common to sorrel.

The late Frank Cook mentioned that in a lasagne the full sized docks are tasty too. I havent tried it yet.

Nutritionally, the docks have more vitamin A than carrots and more vitamin C than spinach. Their seeds, similar to buckwheat can be eaten
Saying all this, aside from the ongoing hedgerow nibbles(which reveal noticable differences in flavour dependent on where picked) docks are probably only ever going to be a post-apocalypse food for me though...

gythagirl



Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 1467
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 12 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Enough, people, everyone knows the only PROPER use for dock leaves is on nettle stings

wildfoodie



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 2169

PostPosted: Fri May 11, 12 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Quote:
Their seeds, similar to buckwheat can be eaten

hmmm, fossilised buckwheat maybe....

Green Rosie



Joined: 13 May 2007
Posts: 10498
Location: Calvados, France
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 12 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Ipso-phyto wrote:
Fair play green rosie, I must watch myself posting late at night...hmmm



Mafro



Joined: 17 Dec 2009
Posts: 68
Location: Kent
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 12 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I have eaten them whilst very very young, used in the same way as vine leaves to wrap little parcels
They were very nice

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40931
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 12 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

bistort is sort of ok

dock wont kill you but hunger would

not in my top hundred salads

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