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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Shooting and Trapping for the Pot
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cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 06 11:45 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

sally_in_wales wrote:
We thought they should be good casseroled...


Oooh! Oooh! The BEST way I know of casseroling them is with wood blewits (you know, those mushrooms your bloke brought home).

Finely chop the holy trinity of stock vegetables (onion, carrot and celery), and caramelise them in a pan. Season the birds (one each is good) inside and out, brown them with the stock veg. De-glaze the pan with a little wine, put plenty of wood blewits in the pan, add in stock to nearly cover. Grind up some juniper berries, salt and pepper, a bay leaf and some parsley, toss those in. Cover, cook one way up for half an hour, turn the birds over and cook for another half hour, take them out and reduce the sauce rapidly for a while.

A fantastic dish, truly wonderful.

If you can't get wood blewits, other mushrooms do; if you have to use bought ones then use oyster mushrooms. In Spring and Summer I've used St. Georges mushrooms, and that is if anything an even better casserole.

Last edited by cab on Sun Jan 29, 06 11:50 pm; edited 1 time in total

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 06 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
I've tried it once and thought it was rather good. I don't buy them because the idea of paying 2.50 for something that's shot as a pest seems a little daft to me. I'd love somewhere to shoot my own or to know someone who I can get them a bit cheaper.


Typically our butcher charges 1:30 for them. Bloody good deal, I think. At that price, we buy them to strip off the breasts, marinade them and barbecue them (eaten hot and bloody). One of the hilights of our big summer do. The carcasses then become a rich pigeon soup.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 06 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Pan-fried pigeon breast is one of my favourite game dishes - dense, dark and very flavoursome. Sadly pigeons rarely come my way these days - they aren't really a pest up here.

whitelegg1



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 409
Location: Woodford Green
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 06 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Almost had pigeon yesterday....

Magpies chased them off before I could get in position behind the climbing frame... ...(Obviously in my garden, I wouldn't be sneaking round a playground with my rifle!)

Will



Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 571
Location: Grenoside, Sheffield
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Back to the top:

A delicious plump-breasted pigeon has taken over the birdtable and lawn, keeping most of the smaller birds off the food, which is irritating given that the blue tits were taking an interest in the birdbox. The neighbourhood cats are no help as it's bigger than most of them.

I want to get rid of it, one way or t'other. Eating it would be a bonus.

Garden is too small for safe shooting - other gardens with small children on three sides and only about 12m long - plus I don't have a gun.

Any suggestions?

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bird lime?

Quote:
Boil the middle part of the holly 7 or 8 hours in water; drain it, and lay it in heaps in the ground, covered with stones, for 2 or 3 weeks, till reduced to a mucilage. Beat this in a mortar, wash it in rain-water, and knead it till free from extraneous matters. Put it into earthen pots, and in 4 or 5 days it will be fit for use. An interior kind is made by boiling linseed-oil for some hours until it becomes a viscid paste.


From here.

Shane



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 3107
Location: Doha. Is hot.
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Illegal, I believe. And non-selective. And cruel.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It wasn't a serious suggestion.

Shane



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 3107
Location: Doha. Is hot.
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good

Will



Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 571
Location: Grenoside, Sheffield
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Been out harvesting holly for the last half an hour, dammit! Hands ripped to shreds.

Last time I ask for suggestions on here mutter mutter snarl

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

C'mon. Call yourself a man? It only takes 4 weeks to make - I'm sure you could find some other use for it.

Will



Joined: 30 Jun 2005
Posts: 571
Location: Grenoside, Sheffield
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm wondering where I can get some gutta-percha from, whether Gas-fitters Cement is up to modern safety standards, and why an optician would attack my eyes with a mixture of molten pitch and wood ash.

Maybe I could use the bird lime to keep small relatives in place when they visit.

Back out with the seccateurs...

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 06 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well we've also got a couple of plum pigeons in the garden and I was thinking of setting a net trap and then keep an eye on it. I would not leave it unwatched so there should be no risk to other animals.

I was reading the other day it is not-legal to catch pigeons just for the pot, you can only kill them if they are a pest and then eat them.

When do they start to lay and I wouldn't wish to leave any young?

whitelegg1



Joined: 05 Apr 2005
Posts: 409
Location: Woodford Green
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 06 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Apparently if they do have young, they are the best.
You obviously need access to the nest, then you go and collect them just before they fly, so no tough flight muscles.

Not sure how legal that one is though!!

Still trying to get those pigies in the garden.

I keep accidently spilling rabbit food on the patio

They are very helpfully cleaning it up and coming very close to the house.

I'm sure they are eyeing up my winter salad shoots, and if one of them gets too close thay will have become a pest!

Bugs



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 10744

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 06 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

whitelegg1 wrote:
You obviously need access to the nest, then you go and collect them just before they fly, so no tough flight muscles


That's how you tend to "harvest" them if you breed them for eating, isn't it? I assume that is still legal though I can't say I find it appealing, personally.

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