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Possible woodworm
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mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1977
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 16 8:52 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

assuming no-one's already mentioned it, a needle & syringe is a good approach ie flush the galleries with a worm killer & try to keep the surface as dry as poss.

I imagine also that maching the boards will include removing any wany edge, & therefore the sapwood...this should go a long way toward solving the problem

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 16 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks guys

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Where do I get a syringe?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33710
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A chemist will give you one, but be suspicious.
A vet or agricultural supplier.
Or, someone who's using your car park next week could drop you one.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33085
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

a bit of insulation from a thin wire glued into the hole of a washing up liquid bottle works rather well and avoids refilling every few ml(and avoids funny looks from your local chemist)

as the holes look like emergence holes there is a good chance some live larvae are not connected to those channels so a thorough treatment will need ends edges and faces to be done to get any that are hiding in situ or when any survivors try to emerge through treated wood.

the stuff you mentioned from screwfix claims to be stain free once dry but it might be worth trying an off cut before you commit to the whole batch

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
Or, someone who's using your car park next week could drop you one.


Did think that, but bank holiday weekend so I thought I'd get it done...

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
as the holes look like emergence holes there is a good chance some live larvae are not connected to those channels so a thorough treatment will need ends edges and faces to be done to get any that are hiding in situ or when any survivors try to emerge through treated wood.


Hmm, didn't really want to do the whole lot, purely from the fact of re-introducing moisture and then rapid re-drying.

I am a bit torn over this...

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33085
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

so long as you coat them evenly and dry them flat on several bearers,turning at intervals so as both faces dry at a similar rate well seasoned timber should not warp or split much.seasoned timber wont absorb as much water as fast dried stuff would

if you rough trimmed the edges to parallel which would remove most of the softwood/bark before treatment the final machining should deal with any minor warps.

depending on conditions drying might be a few days to a couple of weeks .

it would be good to dry the rough planks before machining/joinery to a similar moisture content that they will experience once made up into a table, even if you were not treating them for worms, as that will reduce the chance of the finished table swelling,shrinking or warping when put in a warm dry room.

having thought about the whole thing i recon the best option would be to rough cut to give parallel planks,kiln to 70c to kill any wildlife,rest planks in house to adjust moisture,machine planks to accurate size,do the joinery,finish the surfaces.

if you go down the wet treatment route cut to parallel,treat,dry to touch dry in a shed then dry to room moisture turning throughout the process,machine,joinery,finish

either way it might take a couple of weeks before you get to the joinery stage,with nice timber like that rushing things would be a bad idea.
if i am laying a floor or suchlike i try to always let the timber adjust to it's new location before starting to fit it into place.

if you are planning on having the planks machined into joinery timber the machinist might have or know of a suitable kiln.for a table top tongue and groove is good so i would be looking for somebody with the right machine to edge my planks as im a bit wobbly with a combo plane for such accurate work.
good machining makes the difference between "rustic diy" and "future antique"

unfortunately i have been out of the trades game for so long that gerald would be about 110yrs old by now but there must be good machinists in the greater london area,the folk who do stuff for listed buildings,bespoke fitted furniture etc would be able to do the machining and although not cheap will be good value in the greater scheme of ending up with a super table.(they would want to know the worms were decidedly dead before they mow the planks into shape though).

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
having thought about the whole thing i recon the best option would be to rough cut to give parallel planks,kiln to 70c to kill any wildlife,rest planks in house to adjust moisture,machine planks to accurate size,do the joinery,finish the surfaces.


Certainly sounds the best option but I don't think there's anywhere near here that'd do it.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
either way it might take a couple of weeks before you get to the joinery stage,with nice timber like that rushing things would be a bad idea.


We're into orchard season now, won't be doing anything on this once the boards are rough cut, till winter

Quote:
if i am laying a floor or suchlike i try to always let the timber adjust to it's new location before starting to fit it into place.


That's why we brought the stuff indoors

Quote:
if you are planning on having the planks machined into joinery timber the machinist might have or know of a suitable kiln.


The local guy we have used no longer has a kiln, doesn't know anyone left in the area that would.

Quote:
for a table top tongue and groove is good so i would be looking for somebody with the right machine to edge my planks as im a bit wobbly with a combo plane for such accurate work.


We'll be using a friend's domino (like a cross between a biscuit jointer and dowels)

Unfortunately anywhere near London that still operates relies on the mega money end of the market so not likely to find anywhere within our budget, so might have to go wet treat and back to barn. Which is a proper pain.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33085
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

morgan timbermorgan[url]

[/url=http://dwgeneralwood.co.uk/]dw[url]dw[/url]

iirc morgan's have a london branch it might be worth giving them a call but for a special table it might even be worth a couple of visits to kent .

dw's are london based but i have never traded with them but they seem to say the right sort of things on their website.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33085
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

if you rough them now,treat them with the permethrin stuff and let em dry in the barn til winter i recon they should be fine

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've used dw before they're actually good value, easy to deal with too

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43966
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
if you rough them now,treat them with the permethrin stuff and let em dry in the barn til winter i recon they should be fine


Couple of months in the barn and back indoors?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33085
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 16 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

that seems a good plan ,use plenty of bearers and turn em every few weeks to help em stay flat. it might even be worth putting a top set of bearers a part sheet or plank and weight on em to keep the top one or two from considering curling.

if they barn dry for a few months over summer and house dry over autumn they should be pretty house stable by winter .

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