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Sealing a car port ceiling against the elements

 
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stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1972

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 17 5:50 pm    Post subject: Sealing a car port ceiling against the elements  Reply with quote    

Hope someone can help me please?

I have to reclad a car port ceiling which has living accommodation above.

I've got 30 minute Fire protection moisture resistant board.

What do I cover the underside of the boards with?

Is plaster okay, with an exterior paint it to protect it?

The design of the building is such that in the event of a fire from a car parked there the only way out is via the front door which opens to where the car would ben parked or the terrace above the car port.

A 1960s design flaw.

sg

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43943
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 17 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

can't really visualise it, any chance of a photo?

stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1972

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 17 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hello Tahir,

If you Google "Emsworth Deck House", you will see the type of building I have.

The living accommodation is set up at 1st floor level on a ring of steel supported by 4 legs and a central core, which holds the entrance lobby and stairs to the 1st floor.

The parking area is adjacent to the entrance. The terrace is above where you would park your car.

So, if the car went up in flames your access is through the door beside the blazing car, or off the terrace above the blazing car.

Anyway, the ceiling or under floor of one side of the living accommodation has been remove to have that void insulated. I now need to reinstate that ceiling, with 30 minute fire protection moisture resistant board. As it is not directly exposed to the elements only what wafts under it, I would like to coat it with something to preserve its MR property.

HTH this helps you understand the issue?

sg

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3977
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 17 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If the boards are moisture resistant,why not just paint them.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43943
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 17 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Looks lovely. Is 30 minutes enough? It's not like you've got a fire alarm in the carport (is it?)...

stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1972

PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ty Gwyn wrote:
If the boards are moisture resistant,why not just paint them.


I am not sure if that would be sufficient? If a good quality exterior paint would do it once the joints are scrimmed and filled, I would do that. Do you know of a suitable paint? I have a large tin of exterior wall paint, Dulux I think?

Tahir - 30 minutes is more than was there before, but I take your point. To be safe I would have to redesign the lobby area. move the door to the front. I intend to instal escape windows in every room when I renew the windows.

sg

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32964
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

umm , for the extra few quid i might use a double layer of boards. as to surface best would be expanded metal mesh screwed to the boards as a base and then rendered in a suitable rendering mortar.

re paint if you have a car fire under it the surface flame rating of the paint is fairly irrelevant but sticking to non solvent based class 0 paints might be best.

escape windows makes lots of sense

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33684
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd fill the cavity in the roof with balloons full of water.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41708
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We all know about the efficacy of your fire precautions Nick.

I'd have to say that cars suddenly catching fire for no reason seems pretty rare nowadays.

stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1972

PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
umm , for the extra few quid i might use a double layer of boards. as to surface best would be expanded metal mesh screwed to the boards as a base and then rendered in a suitable rendering mortar.

re paint if you have a car fire under it the surface flame rating of the paint is fairly irrelevant but sticking to non solvent based class 0 paints might be best.

escape windows makes lots of sense


2 layers of boards would protrude below the ceiling line. Not ideal.

Intumescent paint is also an option as a coating on the boards once the joints are sealed.

The original 1960s under surface was stainless steel mesh with a coating off what appears too be concrete and some very fine light grey other material.

Thanks for all the thoughts thus far.

sg

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A couple more thoughts.

1) What have other similar houses done, if there are any?

2) Are building regs involved at all, if so the building inspector can be very helpful.

3) Not sure about double layers, the extra weight might cause problems.

4) Do the makers of the board offer any advice rendering/sealing?

5) You can also get plastic mesh to put under render, that might be easier and lighter than metal mesh/expanding lathe.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43943
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

SG

There's a chance that whatever's under there at the no contains asbestos

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 17 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't know anything about them but what about spraying a fireproof coating ? - Like they spray on structural steelwork.
I guess it's a job for a specialist contractor so maybe it will cost more. OTOH it could work out cheaper as less labour than rendering ??
Cost aside, it would deal with the board joints, give an even finish, extra fire proofing, negligible weight and be thin (5mm ??).

stumbling goat



Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Posts: 1972

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 17 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl -
Your point 1 - One other house that has been refurbished has had UPVc facia panels installed as a ceiling covering. I don't think this is a good idea at all. No fire protection at all. Many are as original rendered finish.

Your point 2 - I will look into this.

Onemanband - I will look at spray coatings, 5mm level smooth, a good idea.

Nick - cavity filled with water filled balloons, interesting, innovative, you must let me know how it works when you have tried this.

sg

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33684
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 17 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bah. You burn one garage to the ground and suddenly you're not an expert.

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