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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9012

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 17 6:10 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Nice pictures Henry. We don't get damsel flies as nowhere near water, but I have seen the more common blue ones in some places, although never that one. Our bees are certainly foraging something, so although can't see it because it is in the top of a tree, our ivy could be out too. Pretty little fungus, and one I suspect is thought to be 'uncommon' because most people don't notice it. We have had some magpie inkcap in the wood again, which is supposed to be fairly uncommon.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5896
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 17 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice snaps Buzzy. That ivy, the wasps go mental for it around our way, it sounds like there are thousands in there when we walk by.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3173
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yesterday we went to a very local wood. Mainly it was a fungus day, but we did hear (and see occasionally through the tree canopy) some young Buzzards with one or more of their parents. There seemed to be a lot of calling which we interpreted as "Feed me! Feed me!

Amongst the fungi we found quite a lot of Dead Man's Fingers (Xylaria polymorpha)




which I didn't know until yesterday are white underneath the black skin. "A bit like coconut." somebody said. "Smells like coconut, too." said somebody else, but the only person who could detect the coconut smell was the one who uses coconut oil hand cream!

There were also some of these:




the Trooping Crumble Cap (Coprinellus disseminatus).

Henry

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41740
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
the Trooping Crumble Cap (Coprinellus disseminatus).

Henry


Brilliant name. I reckon the Queen would be much happier if they changed The Trooping of the Colour to The Trooping of the Crumble.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5896
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Great shots again. I've never even heard of dead mans fingers. They are quite funky though.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33087
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 17 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice snaps, ta for the trouping crumble cap id, i designate all the ones of that sort of form as pixie umbrellas

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9012

PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 17 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, I am inclined to as well Dpack. I don't think I have ever seen the Dead Man's Fingers, but have seen them in the fungus book. We have been looking at fungi recently in the wood with the Volunteers. We have found quite a lot, but not been able to identify very many. The Giant Polyphore has started to come up, and we found some pretty little purple ones, but as they were just starting and hadn't got long enough stems to look at without pulling them up, I don't know which of 3 varieties they were. Nice pictures again Henry.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3173
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 17 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
nice snaps, ta for the trouping crumble cap id, i designate all the ones of that sort of form as pixie umbrellas


Apparently some people call this one Fairy Inkcap, but since the cap doesn't go to liquid ink like gloop, but breaks up when handled, Trooping Crumble Cap seems a better name!

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9012

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 17 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It does sound rather a nice name, although Fairy inkcap is rather nice too, even though less accurate.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4788
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 17 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw a lot of dead man's fingers earlier this summer when we had a lot of rain.

Looking at this site: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/xylaria.html
leads me to believe that I was catching them at their conidial stage since they were more grey than black.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3173
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 17 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wonder if the King Alfred's Cakes (Daldinia concentrica) we found were at their conidial stage, as they were grey, rather than the usual shiny black:




Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9012

PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 17 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They could have been. We somehow usually find them at the mature stage, possible as that is when we are most likely to be collecting the timber. They are quite useful for fire lighting or transporting the fire from one place to another. I believe they used to be put in a tin and used as hand warmers once.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5896
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 17 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is that a fungus?

It looks like something out of a 70's film called Shivers.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3173
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 17 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sgt.colon wrote:
Is that a fungus?

It looks like something out of a 70's film called Shivers.


Yes, it is a fungus, though I admit that it does look rather sinister and alien. You'd not want to find one of those crawling up your arm, would you?

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3173
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 17 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This week we went to a mixed wood, on the edge of a busy road, so most of our walk was accompanied by the constant roar of traffic. At one corner they do a lot of woodworking, creating large piles of woodchips and chainsaw droppings. The fungi like this and we found quite a few species growing on the piles, including a great swarm of the Hares Foot Inkcap (Coprinus lagopus) of which this shot is just a small part:




The area covered by them was several square metres.

There were several other species on the woodchip but I haven't got the names yet - will post more pics when I have them.

On a rotting trunk was this:




the Bluing Bracket (Postia subcaesia).

More photogs when I get some more names (as long as you're not fed up with fungus pictures).

Remarkably few invertebrates about. Apart from the inevitable spiders and tiny flies, all I swept was one Harlequin Ladybird and some very small snails.

Henry

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