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What I do on Mondays!
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Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 17 7:26 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Rather lovely Henry. It does look like hawthorn wood too. I have some that was retrieved from the log pile that I am using for spoons, and the ends are just that colour. Not bad to carve, but inclined to have tiny knots. which are a pain to cut through.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3168
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 17 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This Monday I made it to our walk - the first for a month! We had a very pleasant walk round a local nature reserve - a series of paths and flooded gravel pits. Saw some nice looking distant ducks, and a distant Heron (Ardea cinerea)




We also watched a Kingfisher bathing - at least, that's what we assume it was doing. It didn't seem to be diving for fish, just flopping into the water and coming straight out again - repeated several times. Too distant for pictures, but fascinating to watch.

It was a beautiful sunny autumnal morning - very pleasant.

We didn't find many fungi, but one that we did find was fortunately quite colourful. The Lesser Stagshorn (Calocera cornea)





growing on one of the seats. This is about as big as it gets, apparently.

Henry

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5891
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 17 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have quite a few Heron's living near us.

Shame you couldn't get a shot of the Kingfisher. I do like them.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3168
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 17 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The Kingfisher was too far away, and against the light. No chance of any pix with the kit I had with me. But it was great to watch, nevertheless.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 17 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Kingfishers are beautiful, and something, not living near water that we rarely see. It was a real treat when we went narrow boating to be accompanied along by one. They seem to have a territory and when they get to the end of it they fly back to the beginning again, usually behind any trees of bushes along the bankside.

Husband and son saw a group or 6-8 red kites yesterday playing above a local hill. Didn't know we had that many in the area, although we sometimes see the odd one.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34890
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 17 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I see them every so often, but I've never managed to get a pic.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 17 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw a heron yesterday. Nothing odd about that, except it landed on a roof in an area where there might be the odd fish pond, although not in those bungalows as too small gardens, but no other water. Not the sort of thing you expect when you walk down to the local shops.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3168
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 17 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Last Monday we re-visited a site we had first been to in August, specifically to look for fungi. We had a very successful walk, and the current total stands at 78 which is very good for this year. Most of them were rather small and pale, or larger but uninteresting. However, this one is rather more attractive:




At first we thought it might be Purple Jelly Disc, but it is actually something called Ascotremella faginea which those mycologists have yet to give an English name.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 17 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I looked it up, but there only seems to be scientific data about it, nothing really interesting as far as the layman is concerned. It does have some common names, but they are in German and Swedish or similar, and equally unpronounceable and difficult.

We have had the odd jelly mould; purple I think, but not often.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5891
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 17 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's like something from a Sci-Fi movie. I like it.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3168
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 17 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, it does rather look as if it is in the process of oozing in from another dimension, about to engulf a small village

It is not very common (or not commonly found by those capable of identifying it) which is supposedly why it has not acquired an English name, I encouraged our mycologist to make up one ASAP.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 17 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I suspect that some fungi are uncommon for that reason. One of our volunteers found a quite rare fungus in our woods, but as it was a tiny one I suspect it is only rare because nobody notices it.

Hope they do come up with a suitable name.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5891
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 17 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Maybe we could throw it open to the DS gang to come up with a name for it?

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3168
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 17 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yesterday we went to a nature reserve adjoining a working gravel pit. We saw assorted ducks on the flooded pits, including two Goldeneyes and a Red-crested Pochard (which, being a female, didn't(+-*ko - interpolation from the kitten) have a crest, red or indeed any colour.

We had good views of a Kingfisher, as well.

We found quite a few fungi, the prettiest of which was this Wood Blewit (Lepista nuda)




There is quite a strong body of opinion amongst us that they should be called Mauveits.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8991

PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 17 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They are rather pretty aren't they. Amethyst deceiver are pretty too, and we get some pink ones who's name escapes me, but again, don't think they have an English name, so think the second half is rosea or something similar. For some reason I have awful trouble remembering Latin names I am afraid.

Sounds like an interesting walk again Henry.

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