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What I do on Mondays!
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sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5993
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 18 9:06 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Lovely looking flowers Buzzy.

Can it be too warm for butterflies? It was about 28 degrees last Monday if I remember right.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3283
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 18 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well, it was pretty warm, and as I said, we saw lots of butterflies on the walk in to the meadow. Don't know why they weren't over the meadow.

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3283
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 18 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Today we went to a former limestone/ironstone quarry which has 'reverted to nature' and has some interesting species.

We wanted to see Violet Crown Cup (Sarcosphaera coronaria) which is very rare and this site is the only local one the mycologists know of. This was a good year, and we found several large specimens. We had happy smiling mycologists!




We also hoped to see three butterfly species - Green Hairstreak, Grizzled and Dingy Skipper - that we don't often find. All three made an appearance. though they were all very active and I didn't get any snaps. Never mind, it was good to see them.

Found this flower:




which is the hybrid between Wood Avens and Water Avens. Its scientific name is Geum x intermedium and plants of it can be very variable showing assorted characters of both parent species.

A good walk, as long as one managed to avoid all the dog mess!

Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33632
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 18 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nice , recovering quarry sites are rather special.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9548

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Brilliant. I didn't even know water and wood avens could cross! We have wood avens, but being a dry site (well most of the time), we don't have water avens.

Took a group on a walk through the woods yesterday to look at coppice hazel as they are hoping to get some to make a fence, and found a lovely lot of early purple orchids up the management track we call Orchid Hill. Some had very pale lips to the flowers with the upper parts dark; really lovely. I hope son will bring his camera today, as with a bit of gardening it will make a stunning picture.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 5993
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That first picture looks like something from Alien after they have hatched.

lowri



Joined: 18 Oct 2006
Posts: 1226
Location: ceredigion
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Isn't Herb Bennet a Geum? (small yellow flowers but leaves definitely geum-y) I have got masses of them, mostly in the patches of dead leaves, etc under beech trees, and also coming up on earthy paths.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6180
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

herb bennett = geum urbanum or wood avens

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3283
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gz wrote:
herb bennett = geum urbanum or wood avens


= Blessed Herb or Colewort or Gold Star or Ram's Foot or Yellow Strawberry.

Apparently the roots smell of clove and repel the devil (and moths)

Henry

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41835
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
gz wrote:
herb bennett = geum urbanum or wood avens


= Blessed Herb or Colewort or Gold Star or Ram's Foot or Yellow Strawberry.

Apparently the roots smell of clove and repel the devil (and moths)

Henry


And if jamanda was around she'd say that this is exactly why people should use proper latin binomials.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3283
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 18 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I can see her point when you're writing for learned journals, but I'd hate to lose completely some of the traditional names of plants (and animals).

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9548

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 18 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It doesn't always help. I use two books for flower ID written several years apart; Keeble-Martin and Rose, and the Latin name is sometimes different. Doing class 1 surveys in our woods I write down the English name then put them on a list with the Latin name first. In the interests of my sanity I also have the English name next to it as I seem to have a complete block on the Latin, although I can usually remember the family name.

I didn't realise wood avens was also called herb bennett, so nice to know.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3283
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Wed May 16, 18 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You're so right, MR. I have always known Green Winged Orchid as Orchis morio, but now they tell me I'm supposed to call it Anacamptis morio.

And some of the nomenclaturists get so uptight that if they discovered that the first time somebody published the name Anacamptis it was misprinted Anacmaptis, they'd insist we changed to that!

Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33632
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed May 16, 18 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the tidy up of shroom names is needed but a bit tricky to adjust to.

iirc with plants quite a few have been wrongly recorded as separate spp, the same spp, multiple times as different species.

spose that will take a while and be a bit challenging to adjust to as well.

i like local names but it only works if you only need local references to them while grannie or your apprentice master teaches id, properties etc etc .
same name different plant or visa versa is rather awkward for the transmission of food or pharmacy knowledge as "distance" learning or if you have relocated asking where something grows.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 9548

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 18 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nothofagus = southern beech is another one that is a bit confusing. Apparently it should have been Notofagus but someone put a h in it.

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