Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
... the sky is baby blue, and the just-unfurling leaves ...
Page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 344, 345, 346  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
Author 
 Message
Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 18 8:38 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

I am not too sure about the smart phones either. If they were that smart they would be easy to use, not have to be 'learnt'. It shouldn't be beyond the wit of programmers to make them suitable for people like us Gregotyn, but they don't think the same way somehow. Unlike most people, I more or less understand how the innards are put together, but it is the machine to person interface that I find frustrating.

Our log sacks seem to be going well at the moment too, and we have had a lot of orders for loads coming in over the last few days as well. We will soon be at the stage of saying no more before Christmas on the log load front I am afraid, but as we have the timber to convert to firewood, we should be all right for a few more I think.

After all the bad weather it seems a nice day today, which is just as well, as we have to see someone in the woods today.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 18 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Now there you score heavily over me MR., as I don't understand the innards of the new phones either, and the operation less so. It is the finger flicking to move to places I want but always miss and go too far and can't get back either.

At least with the log sacks you can only go as far as the logs will allow anyway; the nets themselves are easily and quickly bought, but the wood is the governing factor. In some ways it is a shame that you can't start earlier in the season selling, to hopefully reduce the burden at this time of the year when everybody wants them, but it would be even better for you if they were to season the logs at their home, not yours? Do you contact your regular customers and ask them for their log requirements to help you alleviate the winter bottleneck of log production versus delivery? I have found that those seasoned logs I have, have kept well in those small dumpy sacks with a pallet underneath and a cover of an old sheet of plywood on top held down with a few bricks at the corners and the 4 handles tied together as in an "x" formation; this is the first time I have done this, but seems ok-so far. Memo to self; I must learn to do photos!

Have you heard anything from Cassandra? I was wondering how she was faring. I don't and won't do facebook it is beyond my brain level to understand it, and, as a friend at work described me-"A bear of very little brain"-suits me!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 18 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't really like the finger movement on the screen, I much prefer buttons to press, so know what you mean. The reason I have some understanding of the innards is that the assembly of microelectronics and working out how to fit a lot into a tiny space used to be my job.

We do supply log loads to our regular customers all year, and this year we have been selling log sacks fairly well throughout the year too. Sadly, I think a lot sold as log sacks during the summer just went to hear patios and things which imo serves no useful purpose, but we have been selling gently through the summer anyway. We try to get our regular customers to buy during the summer, and most of them have their logs now. We started getting new orders in August, but last winter was quite cold, so think that could be the reason.

The only thing you need to worry about keeping logs in a dumpy sack is if they get wet they can rot. Rather better to either use a dumpy sack with vented sides, or an open sided container of some sort. Stacking on a pallet with a cover over the top is pretty good too.

Cassandra seems to be all right. She has been doing quite a lot of spinning and knitting and getting involved with local politics.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 18 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I always worry that seasoning the logs under a side-less shelter allows the wet to get in and delay the seasoning process. Why I think that is so I don't know. I read the book by a Norwegian about wood seasoning and they have to do the winter fuel in the summer or be very cold. They pile the cut wood up and stack the timber bark side up to keep the weather off the logs, and allow the wind to blow through, seems to work for them. I just don't have the faith in open sides! And here in Wales the rain comes in all directions, and sometimes all at the same time-well it feels like it. I can see the advantage of the pallet as that will allow the wind to blow underneath and have a drying effect. I suppose if you put a back or sides round the stack it would blow down in high winds, and the wet not get away.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 18 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

?

Last edited by gregotyn on Sat Dec 01, 18 11:30 am; edited 1 time in total

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 18 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The pooter shut me down, and then printed me twice, not too sure stereo me is as much as one should have to bear. I will delete the copy. I agree with you regarding heating patios, MR., an outstanding waste of fuel, a limited resource. I find it interesting that we seem to be welcoming more people here with an uncertain future for all of us. It is almost time that we should be doing compulsory cremation. I have written in my will that for me on expiry a body bag to the crem., burn, then a place where I have had good times for the ashes-Long Mynd in Shropshire would suit well.

Works Christmas 'do' tonight, 7pm., home by 9pm and saw and chop wood tomorrow.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 18 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hope you had a good time yesterday evening. I was a bit unsure about the Norwegian way of stacking wood too; a cover over the top is better in the British climate, but if you leave the sides open the air can get in, hopefully more than the rain. I know what you mean about Welsh rain; the only time I ever got washed out of a tent was in Wales, and the only time I never got wet was in '76 when there was water rationing.

We were hoping to go out yesterday, but the weather was so bad we decided to stay in. Didn't do a lot, except some knitting in the evening while watching TV, but a restful day anyway.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6385
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 18 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good to hear that Cassandra is ok. I wonder how the weather is there? North Island NZ has torrential rain and wind. Cairns is apparently 10 degrees higher than normal at 45 degrees and it isn't even midsummer yet.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 18 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

From her last post it sounded rather like here; wet, windy and cold. I would say their weather is even more variable than ours and windier too. She has just sent me a knitting pattern for a beanie she has been working on. She is hoping to sell the patterns, perhaps as a kit, thorough her local wool shop.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 18 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My only encounter with being washed out of a tent was in Cornwall, camping with the scouts. The scout chief had checked the tents at the morning inspection and marked ours for a repair where there was a small tear in the apex in the middle of the roof. Well the storm got there with serious rain and our tent ripped open and so that last night was spent in other tents at 7 to a tent not 6 as we had to be dispersed to continue the night's sleep-theory only! The '76 summer when all the sun was about we were holidaying on Scotland where it was not so hot as England, I was happy 'er indoors was not. My wife was a sun fiend. She now has a house in California where the sun shines a lot of the time!

I spent Sunday with a friend in the Cotswolds looking for his parents grave stone. which was not hard as he had obviously been before-twice at least as both parents ashes are in the same plot. However the next problem was that he was interested in finding another relative. He wrote to the church and all they could tell us that the deceased Auntie was thought to be in a grave 3 places to the north on another named grave, which we eventually found, then looked for the 3 places, but all that was there was nothing in stones to mark the grave, so the aged aunt must have been there a long time for the stone to disappear. anyway it was a good day off in spite of the fact I should be chopping wood, well I will make up for it today I hope. I put 35 nets in the shop last month, so I am panicking how much more will I have to do for the Christmas surge. I am hoping 150 will see me through, so I need 200 to be safe!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 18 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That sounds more dramatic than any camping I have ever had. The time we got rained out of out tent in Wales, we spent the night in the back of the car, which luckily was an estate, so we just put the seats down and put our bed in. I did wake up at one came to find there was water under my sleeping bag, but luckily under the groundsheet too. We gave up on that camp; with the Scouts, where husband and I were leaders. I ended up trying to take some soaking dried peas in a pot back to headquarters where we spent the rest of the weekend. On those occasions, being the only woman, and not yet married to my now husband, I slept on my own in the kitchen.

I am trying to build up a stock of log sacks. One outlet has plenty, but as I have been recommending people to them, that may not last. The other big outlet may be wanting some more, but it is still mild here, so may not be as much call this year as last. Looking at the number I have already done, I think it will be far more this year than last as it carried on through the summer.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 18 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes it was dramatic when it is middle of the night and you have to gather all you can and get out of your tent, annoy others to let you into theirs, and to get as much dry clothing with you for the next day- going home-which was beautiful! At least it wasn't before the last night!

It is fairly mild here too, but a bit on the wet side now-not heavy rain but drizzle, the sort that gets you wet without you noticing. I have had a frost or two in the mornings recently, but not much, the gritters did their job on the one occasion where needed. I am hoping to get a good weekend of chopping to which end I have been cutting blanks ready for the brummock.

It is a pity you are not closer as I have a lot of small logs available
for sale; I have made an attempt to get into the market, but to no avail so far here. Most likely explanation is that there are too many at it already. I have sold a few to a friend, but would like to be selling a lot!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34441
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 18 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

my nocturnal camping evictions have included bad ants, melting snow hole, storm surge in a sudden gale, boar, landslide and a few others. ants was the nastiest.

a while back i was rather unusually on a campsite on top of a cornish cliff.
my somewhat paracord and bits of tentage thing survived a serious overnight gale, out of the hundred or so other assorted "normal" tents two were intact, they were a blacks top range expedition tunnel tent and a yankee made himalaya quality one.
there was only us left and we got some choice bits n bobs from the abandoned wreckage .
very educational re tentage

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10118

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 18 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We used to do quite a lot of camping, but not for a good few years now. We helped to run a number of Scout camps, some of which were memorable for the weather, usually of the bad kind. We had one camp where it started to rain the day after we arrived, stopped for an hour or so each lunch time, when we aired our bedding, but apart from that didn't stop until the day we left. We took the boys swimming one day to dry them out! On another, we had very wet and windy weather, and had to take clothes and bedding into the nearest town to dry at the launderette so each boy had at least some clothes and bedding dry. On parents day one boy was reduced to an overlong Scouters shirt, but they all stayed, and we all survived.

Most of our tent work is now for shows, and our previous experience at least allows us to manage in bad weather as we can storm rig our 4.5x3m tent and bought a really sturdy one to survive bad weather.

Glad to say the worst we ever really had with wildlife was when a New Forest pony looked in on husband, when we were camping with his family, back long before we were married.

Gregotyn, where you live there are probably more people doing firewood for a smaller population. Round here we are mainly urban and suburban, so people like us are in some ways a bit of a rarity, but a fair number of people have wood burning stoves, so there is probably more call for firewood from those of us that do it.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1753
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 18 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes MR., I think you are right, and as a newcomer-only 30 years-I would be second choice from a born and bred woodman to buy from. The kindling is going well right now-steady is how I like it need to chop about 15 nets a week to keep on top of it. When it goes very quickly it is the folks who haven't yet turned on the central heating, and that surge has subsided this week from a minimum of 30 per week to around 10. It may sound silly but I prefer it steady rather than the earlier mad rush. What I have in stock will see me through the holiday period. I guess my attempt at logs would always be a fight with the established loggers and a much greater pull on my strength than the kindling. What I want more than anything now is to find a man who will cut some big branches down for me on 3 large trees which are preventing the tractor from mowing the whole field and obviously restricting grass growth. The branches also makes carting hay from the fields above a problem as I want to go under those branches to come down a less steep part of the field. I wish your husband lived next door-for a fee-I guess he would be able to do the job in his stride.

Yes, dpack, if you ain't set up for camping properly don't do it, sod's law will always get you one way or another. I guess you wouldn't be able to take account for your mishaps with the ants and boar, both of which can do some serious damage to all in their wake.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 344, 345, 346  Next
Page 345 of 346
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com