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Adventures in grafting
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 18 6:14 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

cancel that , the first graft was dead and the rootstock was putting out leaves from beneath the deceased

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5366
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 18 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

d'oh!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 18 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

on the bright side it is a fresh green shoot for a rooting experiment

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10406

PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 18 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That's a pity. Have another go at the right time of year.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 18 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

a 4 yr old mm111 rootstock in a pot will become a mother plant for greenwood shoots if fairly savagely pruned and then nursed and pampered

getting 1 0f 10 from seaweed based rooting powder using semi hardwood cuttings in late spring. educational.

i have 3 small batches of various types of cuttings in 200mg/l I3BA and cut flower feed mix.
in 24 hrs they will get potted on into sterile cutting compost
they are in a propagator.

it is a mid range concentration for slowish soak and the only variable is the type of stick in the splosh. cunning

biopunk horticulture is fun.

as the mothers can be persuaded to produce nice green shoots i recon i could go micro culture if needs be.
or root em from being earthed up if there is a suitable location .

a free supply of " new " rootstocks seems like a good idea if adventures in grafting "unknown" old apples might happen .

the skill is transferable if it doesn’t

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 15188
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 18 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

So what sort of grafting technique is best for this time of year?
I have cherries, plums, apples and pears to play with...

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 18 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

roostock preparation ready for dormant period styles.

the cuttings are all planted, the youngest shoots look a bit chemically challenged but the older and semi hardwood ones look quite perky so far.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 19 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

those did not go too well

the summer rootstock twigs casually pushed into damp soil still seem alive

today i collected , the little russet, the horizontal one i did the serious prune on, a rather nice high acid cooker that keeps, a cooker then eater and a rather spiffing pear that is ripe for a day.

all unidentified although we have tried in the right places

i have plenty of suitable rootstock, tools ,film etc.

wonder what might happen

an unknown russet graft from before has definitely taken and needs a bit of tlc in the soil department

the twigs to provide the scions are now in a bag outside to stay quiet until tomorrow which is likely to be frankentree city and needs decent light.

i dont know what your microclimates are but my pear root stock has just started to show green from the buds and all of the scion material looks ready to go.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10406

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 19 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Our apples aren't showing too much sign at the moment, and we don't have pears, but they are behind a hedge to the immediate south of them, so probably not long.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 19 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

about 10 in assorted styles onto 5 maturing rootstocks.
that covers the pear and 3 types of apple so tomorrow i have 2 more types to do

one of the rootstocks was ideal as there were 3 perfect branches that matched scion twigs so they got a rather tidy end to end angled cut and shut

the rest were a mix of slips and custom insets. some of the rootstocks are a bit gnarly

i will report back on survival etc

ps the japanese knife is ace now i have started to give it a properly sharpened edge and it has a knot whipped handle
white paper metal, beaten, tempered and given a half decent bench hone by the maker, nowt wrong with self steel if it is good quality and the right sort for that tool.

the handedness of the cut is both perfect and a bit awkward when working on a small gnarly tree in a pot cut, as a table knife for twig surgery is is fairly easy to use.
better than a centre edged blade
the angles seem about right for green bark and wood

a few days with the water stones might get a very nice edge

i was a bit dubious about it at first but i am warming to the simplicity and function.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 19 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i just found that one of the rootstocks has 2 successful grafts from last year
i was looking to see if it was a suitable host and spotted them so that makes two new trees so far, new from old and unidentified but new to this collection.
trimmed to allow the scions to thrive.

i can think of a few hundred old fruit trees round york, most are pretty easy to id once you check the relevant "popular" types from the estimated planting dates but there are some that nobody seems to be able to name so far.

if i expand a bit chances are i will hear of plenty others but for the mo i will stick to one hospital site until i get those bagged.

back to the surgeons bench

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 19 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

if i do apples and pears ( if i can ) i needs somebody to do the plums, gages and damsons and bullace.

the york historic collection is extensive and includes loads i have never seen before.
at a guess there must be a few hundred that i know of.

the hedge rows at the edge of the ridge and furrow that have survived are rich in "rustic " prunus as are remnants of estate/field hedges.

1950 years as a city and a place collects fruit tree genetics

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10406

PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 19 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I know that our local country park had some crab apples identified and found they had they had some unknown varieties. You may well have the same.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34899
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 19 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i can think of a crab hedge about 100 yrs old with 30 varieties in a 100 yards.

a deliberate planting of no two the same

the small prunus things are both planted and wildings. there are lots of varieties.

the prunus cultivars in the remnants of orchards and gardens are quite varied and less than 50% identified.

york has been a international port, national road hub and a prosperous walled city for rather a long time, include a few miles around the walls and it is far more biodiverse than many patches the same size.
that goes for the full spectrum of bio ( that can find a microclimate suitable for them ) but it is very noticeable with plants that folk have cultivated or welcomed as wildings.

leaving out the roman, scandi and norman influences ( which do show in the biological census ) the trade and wealth of the middle ages until now has brought a huge selection of plants to a smallish place.
it seems plausible that many of the unknown fruit trees are locally grafted from older genetics by or for whoever planted them.

ed grafting has been around for a very long time so some of the genetics could be a lot older than the old trees,
for example the apple i recon is about 250 to 300 yrs old is a graft onto a rootstock so it was taken from a previous tree ( posh house, walled garden, just a corner of 2 walls standing, reused as part of the 18th/19th/20 c hospital grounds .)

the pear i nipped is from the same place, 3 very old trunks against the wall. possibly fan trained originally? but now a bit tall and quite stout of trunk with assorted branches.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10406

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 19 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nice to keep the old varieties going. Some of the crosses might be interesting too. That was how the original Cox started if I remember rightly.

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