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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 19 7:57 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

there are a selection of mini snails in the yard, dog wee is a brutal sample method but it is quite educational as to what random victims show up in the biodiversity record.
on a happier note mini snails are doing well in the bramble bed and assorted tubs n crevices.

i should learn more about mini snails but so far with a little help some have names.
since i introduced the anti slug nematodes and developed a hedge base soil the mini snails have thrived.

a lot of spp for such a small space, 12' by 2 ' 5 spp so far

most with names so far seem to be riverside / flood plain spp which is to be expected, there are quite a few i still need to id

in the immediate area there are rather a lot of varieties of snails, many of which i have not seen elsewhere.
some of the winkle sized stripey jobbers that live on snail wall are either very variable or there are a lot of spp/sub spp.

the geology and architecture are snail friendly and we have had a lot of trade over a couple of millennia.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Mar 22, 19 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the sammison sagas continue with some happy news of several new members of the family.

fousands of em.
not quite, maybe half a dozen it is hard to tell until you get to know them by name but they do scuttle about like fousands.

they seem to be darkish like mrs sammison and just as plump

chompy is somewhat taken aback by more than one at a time

bird town is a bit quiet most of the time with the odd "coach party " of visitors and a few of the regulars

there was a conclave of crow parliaments a week or so ago and since then the 120 or so local ones are still having a party .

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10467

PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 19 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Our rooks have been silent since the peregrine took over their pylon tower, but we have some pigeons, and a robin. Sadly the front door robin seems to have gone, and the new owner of the territory isn't so keen on coming to be fed.

In the woods we have heard blackbirds, and possibly a marsh tit. Great and bluetits around in both garden and woods, and long tailed tits visit us in the woods fairly frequently. I think they may nest there. Tawny owls are in evidence in the afternoons too, and have seen several deer over the last few days.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10467

PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 19 7:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Think we heard a turtle dove and a black cap in the woods yesterday. The odd bluebell coming up in bud, but not too many yet, so hope they will hold off until at least early April.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2024
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 19 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

First sighting of the season, out enjoying the sunshine.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 19 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

charming

as i have no idea what it is beyond it is probably a snake, do they bite and how nasty is that? and are they delicious? are they rare and therefore delicious is an ethical issue?

sorry i do have a problem of seeing wildlife and thinking recipes and so far the snakes i have eaten have been delicious. to balance that i have looked after a few who if not pals were not dinner and ethics outbid delicious with our two uk species.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2024
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Look at the leaves. The snake is about the diameter of my index finger. I didn't bother this one but when I have handled them in the past the worst they do is void some stinky crap from their cloaca. Doubt they could open their mouth sufficiently to really bite me.

Biggest native snake I have ever caught, myself, was a 6 foot long black racer. Again, not aggressive.

Milk snakes, even young ones, are.

There are copperheads (poisonous) in New Jersey but I have never seen them.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

thanks, .

of our two the grass snakes are a few feet long , they can nip a finger but are only very mildly toxic to mammals with most not reacting , however their dental hygiene is a little lax so the puncture wounds often need good irrigation and nursing.

adders are about 18" to 2 ft long and finger thick and not only can bite but have a moderately toxic venom.
dog or human under 50 lb (25 kg )will be at risk of death from a full bite and envenomation
adult humans usually survive but it hurts like hell and can cause serious long term damage.
i have had a couple of near misses when climbing as they like to sun themselves on the ledge one is aiming for so after putting a hand next to them you can get nose to nose
i know of a few lost dogs and avoid addery places with mutts.
decent boots will prevent bites if you accidentally step on or too close to one you have not seen.
never poke about bare handed in places they live as a decent glove and/ or stick beats fangs.
they are not aggressive like some but they do get a bit bitey if touched or scared, for the most part if you see them you are safe if you say hello and keep a few feet away.

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 815
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
few feet away.


or when you stop running

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    


running does not help with some of the forrin ones, they can be a bit quick and chase as well as ambush. some jump.

i met some very naughty ones in london zoo, at a safe distance with their still living handler while i was a science tech but the cobra i met in a pet shop was supervised by a brick on the dustbin lid and barry with a broom

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ps it was the sort that squirt as well as bite.

a class 4 critter

since the dangeroos wild animal act of iirc 1979 folk with beasts usually know how to look after them and keep the public safe

i met a few unusual pets in the past even after that legislation i can think of a 7 ft croc that acted like a spaniel around a london flat and a pair of very house cat lions in a surrey garden.

shhh i have had a couple of things were were more wolf than dog so pot kettle etc .

i decided i was not responsible enough to become part of the rare variety poison frog breeding program which was probably wise.
the habitat control and critter wrangling seemed ok but frog skin to soft entry point or a reduced rollcall can be a bit extreme and it needs a very long term commitment so i declined the offer

it was nice to be asked but there are limits to helping the endangered,

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 19 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the three bird feeders arrived, a tube n hole thing for seeds and a nut basket and a lumps basket.
£10, bargain.

i have put them closer to the window than previous feeding spots and they will still get other stuff elsewhere but i thought sparrows and other seed eaters might like a "private members club "

once they get used to them they can do payback with entertainment and education

Shane



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 3106
Location: Doha. Is hot.
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 19 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just make him feel all loved again, I'm going to champion the smooth snake - very rare in the UK, but a native species nonetheless!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10467

PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 19 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Very rare. It likes sandy heathland and is often found in the same places as the equally rare sand lizard. I just checked it and thought I had heard the two mentioned together. We once went on a forestry meeting to a place they lived. There had been a film shoot near it once, and that area had to be roped off so nobody went in it, but they remained unfazed with a full scale battle scene occurring quite close to them apparently.

We have slow worms in both woods and garden, but although we have adders nearby, I have never seen one in the woods. Think they too prefer more heathy areas, and we don't have that.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35011
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 19 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

2 species of "native" ladybird lurking in the brambles waiting for the first bloom of aphids

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