Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Wildlife
Page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 24, 25, 26, 27, 28  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment
Author 
 Message
dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35392
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 19 1:28 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

they are small but they are rather active, iirc they burn more calories of food per gram of critter than most., about ten times the rate of an active human

is it about 250 bpm for breathing and 1200 for heart rate? 50 wing beats a second

that is living fast so how little they eat is what strikes me as really special, considering what they can do they are quite efficient in a fast jet or racing car sort of way.

they dont seem to have invaded the uk and i don't recall them in mainland europe but we do have a few in " zoo " type bird and butterfly houses.

charming wee critters

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10802

PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 19 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think it is too cold for them here Dpack, but as you say, they have to eat a lot for their size to keep going at that rate. I don't think I have ever seen one in real life, but they look beautiful on TV.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41968
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 19 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We've got voles!

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2094
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 19 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It's not the temperature. I don't think there is any way for hummingbirds to reach you, Mistress Rose. The ruby throat hummingbirds that summer in New Jersey fly down to Mexico / Central America for the winter. Return in the late spring. Both times have to fly non-stop over the Gulf of Mexico. There are a few other species on the west coast - Arizona, California. No way any of them can cross the ocean.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10802

PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 19 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No, and they are not kept as pets very much either, so no chance of escapees. There are some good colonies of parakeets in odd places in the UK and they come from Australia I think, so they must be escapees, or ones let loose as they couldn't fly from Aus either.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2094
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 19 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have starlings, quite large flocks of them in the winter, because some lunatic man wanted all the birds mentioned in Shakespeare to be here in the USA. He released a number of them in Central Park in the 19th century.

Not quite sure how house sparrows (aka English sparrows) got here but they are also an import. They did better before the changeover from horses to automobiles.

Then there's the house finch, or is it purple finch - not sure which species but from its western / California native range a few were released from a New York City pet store and they are now very well established over a huge range.

Monk parakeets are well established in New York City and elsewhere you would not expect them to survive, let alone thrive.
https://wildparrotsny.com/index/home.html
Huge colony nests on power poles to the dismay and upset of the electric companies. Major kerfuffles as they want the nests removed (along with birds) and the bird lovers push back.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35392
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 19 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the shakespear fan changed the avian fauna of the usa big style with various consequences to other flora and fauna

invasive spp or an evolutionary forcing?
as an ethical question i really don't know what to think, we could probably do without grey squirrels but they seem to be suited to the place etc
as a fossil fan i would favour the latter and consider the modern human to be in the same category as the kt boundary asteroid or the permian temp and chem glitch as a forcing of change via extinctions

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10802

PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 19 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We could definitely do without grey squirrels Dpack. They do a lot of damage to trees which can weaken and kill them, or cause limbs to fall. We often find a fallen branch with marks indicating originally a squirrel chewed the top, then rot set in and the branch fell some years later. We see gnaw marks on trees at a height that only squirrels can cause (deer don't get 10up a tree in a branch crutch), and they will also bark strip very badly, again far too high for it to be deer.

I can understand your power companies having trouble with the parakeets Jam Lady. They could cause flashover on higher voltage power lines, and must make maintenance difficult. Not sure what will happen if our semi-resident peregrine in the pylon near home objects to work on the tower.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35392
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 19 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

this afternoon i got to see something rather special and rather creepy.

i noticed movement on the compost of my lavender in a huge pot, what it was puzzled me.

what it was , a very small parasitic wasp riding a brownish beetle 3 times it's size
digging into the compost.

as far as i could tell the wasp was riding it with a neck grip/bareback style leg grip and using the thrashing legs to dig. i do not know if stinging was involved ( it was not fighting and might well have been "subdued " before i saw them) but it's leggs were pretty frisky and the combo dug quite fast, waspy was definitely controlling the poor thing/yummy snack for the kids and i assume they kept going down until waspy was happy with the nursery.

beautiful and grim.

this is why i need a decent camera hanging round my neck when i am out there unless im being messy, planning a studio style shoot for that sort of moment would be rather tricky but to grab it when it presents just needs kit, some good presets, luck/observation and pap em when they are not looking

fibre optic cam might be far too grim:roll:

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10802

PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 19 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have been seeing a rather pretty blue flower around, mainly at roadside and other odd places with wild flowers on open ground lately, and couldn't remember what it was. Finally came to me, and I just checked it; chicory. If you see it it is a tall spike with very pretty blue aster like flowers. In flower now.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2094
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 19 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not a hummingbird but rather a hummingbird moth



Convergent evolution - just like hummingbirds and bats they hover to feed on nectar in flowers.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35392
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 19 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cute moth, it looks a bit like our hawkmoths but they don't hover to feed afaik

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2094
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 19 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Same genera, Hemaris but different species

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35392
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 19 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

they share the same hair colourist

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2094
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 19 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I thought that was Trump and Johnson

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 24, 25, 26, 27, 28  Next
Page 25 of 28
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com