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The Chicken who thinks she is a parrot

 
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Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 8697
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 20 5:22 pm    Post subject: The Chicken who thinks she is a parrot Reply with quote
    

Well, as some of you might have read, Dotty has decided she is a parrot. You wouldn't think that with her somewhat dumpy nature that she could launch herself onto someone's shoulder but she can!

I had one of the neighbour's come over for a chat about broadband today and she happens to be scared of chickens. Dotty of course decided that the neighbour really needed a chicken on her shoulder as therapy.

Why can't I have normal pets?

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5788
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 20 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I thought you were going to say it was talking. Now I'm mildly disappointed

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 8697
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 20 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The neighbours think I'm weird enough as it is. They don't know about the talking!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38884
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 20 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



no such thing as normal pets for the likes of us

my last "pet" chook was cheepycheap, hatched by me and the only hatchling from the dirty 4 dozen and my big cock.

cage/hand reared as a chick by me so totally imprinted, when the time was right i introduced her to hunting by lamping moths into the caravan with a Milwaukee 28 v work lamp
after that it was me playing old momma veloceraptor til she was properly farmyard free range

all went well til she laid one egg and dropped dead the next morning.

beyond end of days genetics from the dirty 4 dozen rescue GBH's x posh golden geezer was very pretty but one of 18 hatched and then the adult went pop.
odd pet but ace to have known, her way of "finding" a bucket of milk or pigfood "for her" could be well stealthy and brinks mat would have lost breakfast bacon


mytoad, never let on to having a name, from a toadpole was nice for 3 years til it got big enough to release.
it was the runt of 7 and in no state to take to the wild that spring so i fattened it up, but it took a while
again it was taught tradecraft to give it a good start in the wild which is fun as it involves raising foods of a suitable demeanour and size for mytoad as well.
can i please introduce the indian stick insects, each instar is perfect as a toad grows in the first few months, after that it gets inventive.

a half wolf and a nearly all wolf at different times, half wolf , no lead in south london was fun, nearly all was such a good geezer, everyone loved uncle ronnie. especially ki,who was unusual and wonderful as well but in no way could be thought "normal"

and a serious 30kg one, home grown over 4 generations, good stealth entry dog with a bit of a nip and a rather unusual set of skills and attitudes, a few downsizers met him few knew him and less ever saw what he was capable of subtly or robustly, he played with most folk although a happy greeting with a teeth to nose kiss or nipped in the bum at 4 am in the dark and then laughed at for not noticing and saying hello does confuse some folk:twisted: he ,and his brother with a different skill set, were clever and have improved canine genetics wherever they could which includes a fair chunk of the mainland as well as all corners of the uk/roi.
my one improved a posh Weimaraner litter a lot by stealth through a kitchen window while he was out for a scamper, fella was upset, i mentioned the improvements, he shut up:twisted:
he was the sort of mutt that if you went for a walk on a beach he would climb the cliff and grin from 60 feet up, but he also could be very gentle if he needed to.
i love him to bits and i am pretty hard to shock but some of his "ways" were special, from age 10 months to about 2 we were chained together unless inside a secure space or closely supervised, i dont mean symbolically i mean literally,
the enthusiasm of that one was spectacular in many ways some of which etc
re the chain thing he ate leads, ropes, 12mm static that was a meter long and one end was clipped to my wrist:roll: at that point 3 m of light ,fairly quiet with practice, chain and two screw gate mini crabs to attach neck and wrist directly worked a treat. after that we both knew what each
he did turn out awesomely well in so many ways that his serious"faults"were worth understanding and indulging him as safely as possible unless they were really bad
some of his stories are only fit for naughty corner with perhaps a nice cup of sedatives, he might have felt the same way about me
those "pets" are some of the more normal ones

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 8697
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 20 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Oh my word dpack, that makes my dog Gomez (sadly moved off this mortal sphere) sound relatively sane.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6893
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 20 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Don't they say that pets take after their owners?

Did it cure your neighbour of her chicken fear?

Some of our pets sound great DPack and nothing less that what I would expect of your animals.

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 8697
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 20 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

No, Dotty definitely did NOT cure the neighbour. In my defence I did warn her. She clearly thought I was joking.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5788
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 20 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Somehow my sister in law discovered that our dog absolutely loves to have her cheeks sniffed. It may have been a mutual discovery. Ever since then when the dog feels a need to reinforce social bonds and make sure she's still a valued member of the pack, and we happen to be seated low enough to be in range she sits herself perpendicular to you and stretches her head out in front of your face, with maybe 1 cm gap, to "subtly" hint that it's time for sniffs.
Then she hands you her paw so that you can give her a paw rub at the same time. .
It's fun explaining to house guests that she really likes them when she chooses to solicit sniffs from them as well.

The calming influence of paw rubs is pretty helpful when she's anxious at the vet's office

Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 8697
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 20 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



The weird and the wonderful!

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