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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 20 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that was little bracket one who pops by for a meal sometimes,
little bracket two seems to be fed at the nest mostly

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12059

PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 20 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Glad little bracket one is still around.

Saw a few assorted butterflies on the buddleia today, but not as many as I would expect. No idea why it should be a bad butterfly year but it doesn't seem too good. I am not helping the cabbage white population for next year as I am de-egging my cabbages every couple of days.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2148
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 20 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



Tiger swallowtail on bottlebrush buckeye, Aesculus parviflora, today.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12059

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 20 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That is a pretty spectacular butterfly Jam Lady. I am familiar with the red buckeye; we tend to call them red horse chestnut as they are very similar to our own horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum but don't know that one.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 20 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

nice butterfly and snap of it

we have a few very colourful ones this side of the pond but most are quite subtly dressed

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 20 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ai individual recognition gets a mention along with the what species thing.


Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2148
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 20 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose, very good! It is in the horse chestnut family. Native to southeastern USA, bottlebrush buckeye is a large, suckering shrub. I raised this one from seed. We moved it here when we came to New Jersey a couple of decades ago. It was in one of the half-dozen or so wardrobe cartons that were filled with shrubs, first off moving truck. I like the fact that it is summer flowering. Butterflies like it too. And this summer there are numerous tiny metallic bright little insects, unknown to me, busily visiting.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12059

PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 20 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I looked it up as I was totally unfamiliar with it, and saw that it is native to the southeastern USA, which is probably why we don't have it here. I suspect the weather might be wrong for it as we are cool and damp. As I knew the 'red horse chestnut' was a buckeye, and with the latin name, it came up on the search engine.

Dpack, it seems you are on the right track with your sparrow ID. Nice to know that this is recognised by ornithologists, but that most rely on AI rather than constant observation as you do.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 20 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

the amount of fruit on the brambles has made any observations let alone constant ones a bit tricky

there is more bush than airspace at the mo

the sammisons had a visitation from a ratty troll on friday night/sat morning(friday was bin day round here but another refurb has been started as well as the pub reopening)

i have not seen it since but neither have i seen a sammison

the sparrows are between broods at the mo, clutches seem to stick together for quite a while, the missing may be fallen or moved to a new colony although i have not noticed any external ones joining this colony like they do in winter/early spring

mr and mrs brack are only feeding themselves at the mo, the two little brackets are still around but not "resident"

not seen grin much for a while, or a pair of grins teaching young grin, it might be that now there are more people in the city centre there is more food for pigeons(they looked quite bewildered at a lockdown town and moved out to forage something other than kebab rinds and pizza crusts )
more pigeons=a smaller happy hunting ground

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12059

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 20 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Judging by the number of pigeons in our and sons garden, they have moved out to suburbia.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 20 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

the sammison saga continues

youngii ran from the wood shed, which was his home pre rat, over my foot and hid at the base of the bramble i was sitting against

well he hid apart from his tail:lol:

i provided words of comfort and a promise of protection and then stroked his tail 3 times, he was cool with that, and he smiled nicely as he carefully climbed up the bramble to wall top, then i gave him some seeds on the wall top

that was nice

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12059

PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 20 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

How lovely. I must say that when we have seen wood mice foraging around in the leaves near us it has been rather nice. They totally ignore us and don't see us as a threat.

Doing a bit of observation along the track by our 'yard' have betony in flower, which is making a nice show, and not seen it there before, and some marsh cudweed Gnaphalium uliginosum. We usually get a little of that somewhere along the track. The area the betony is flowering has been lovely since the spring with violets, bugle, speedwell and now yellow pimpernel and betony.

Down the road from us, someone has a lovely display of harebells in their lawn, and the other way, they are flowering on a bank by the side of the road, so hope the contractors leave them alone. There was some scabious starting to flower on a grass patch down the road, but that has of course now been mowed as people complain if it gets 'untidy'. I have found a tiny bit of wild thyme flowering in the grass, so with any luck, that will spread. There was quite a good sized patch, but a new telephone connection box was put in, right on the largest patch, so hope it will re-establish.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 20 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

it was a rather nice moment
i have had a few, but that one was comrade rather than "that human is no threat and it has food"
if i had met the rat first etc does not apply, it is a matter of hit the target and no collateral murder
this rat has displeased me, and them, big style

they should be settled in, having litters and storing food in their "silos"
at the mo they have an ogre living in their house and despoiling their granary

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38161
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 20 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

if you go down to the woods...



the report suggests a pizza mistake, i recon it was planning on ordering pizza

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3703
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 20 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



Henry

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