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... the sky is baby blue, and the just-unfurling leaves ...
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gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 20 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I have looked at the stone I had, and think I have enough to make a well surround after the good stuff has been sold. I have 3 wells all together on the holding, one of which has not yet come to light, but my neighbour knows where-he says, so I'm hoping. He retires soon so we will get the divining rods out and have a go in the area. One of those things I have done in the past, and not sure how, but I have managed to find water. Funnily enough I struck water a few weeks back when putting in the gatepost; I took the advice of a mate to move the hole I was digging to 5 feet when at around 4 ft he said to move it I did to a new place and and there was the pipe which I took a chip out of it so I wrapped it in pop bottle plastic and filled it in! I have completed the original hole now, and when the weather changes to good weather I will "plant" the post. It needs to be right as the gate is 12 feet wide and heavy. The post is about 10 feet long and 10 inches square. I was lucky in my place of choice as there were stones, but all came out of the hole ok without bulges in the sides. I am not sure how to fill the hole in. I have had 2 advisors-plan1 is to backfill with stones and soil rammed in. Plan 2 is to concrete the post in, I like the concrete idea with a few stones in to eke the concrete out a bit. Any opinions? I read on a bit and as you say a working well and a no fertiliser policy should attract the organic crowd. There have been no chemicals on my holding in my time here-at least 10 years.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7038
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 20 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I had to do some 8" posts in the past, in very stony ground.
As you said, post in hole, wedge with stones to keep it vertical then postcrete.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38655
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 20 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

gz wrote:
I had to do some 8" posts in the past, in very stony ground.
As you said, post in hole, wedge with stones to keep it vertical then postcrete.


this
+ lots of postcrete as a counterweight to the leverage of the gate

minimal wedging , maximum postcrete , an extra £20 quid to use plenty is best for a do it once job

if you can "bulb" the bottom of the hole a bit it helps to get the mass where it is most useful, but just making the post fit the hole with postcrete can work fine

your 10 inch sq post is my sort of engineering

something that has puzzled me is why hinge side gateposts are not usually braced back to a ground anchor, tis normal for wire fence corner posts etc
triangles are ace

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4360
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 20 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Ram it with soil,concrete will encourage it to rot quicker.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12318

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 20 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Agree with Ty Gwyn. If the post is oak or chestnut the concrete attacks the wood and visa versa so it rots faster. Well rammed earth and stones is best. You could also try a tie bar back to a bracing post set backwards from the gate to help take the weight.

Dowsing for the well seems a good option. Just make sure you find it by dowsing and don't fall down it. We have had good results looking for a waterpipe that goes across the woods, and also where services ran when erecting a fence by dowsing.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 20 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The post is tanilized softwood and a layer of 2 coats of creosote, so should see me out. My old mate, now too far gone to do the job said, "back fill with big stones and soil rammed", but I do like the idea of concrete as well as a few big stones. It is in an area where water flows about a half metre away-could be interesting! The post will get attached to a barn at some point when the fence is done at about 2 posts distant and I will put wire to the steel of the barn RSJ from the gatepost. The next job is to put the holes through the post with the aim being to do this with a tall drill I have so that the holes for the hinges at in horizontally and not by my eye a task on its own!
I agree with you dpack, triangles are the strongest form of keeping things in their correct place. I will bulb the base as you sugest the worst thing is that this gate is going on a down slope and a left to right slope. I have decided to correct this by having a flexible bar across from the gate, which will start at the high side and as the gate closes the bar will rise up-theory! The closing post is only 8 inches square saving about £10! All good fun just need the weather to change for a while. I was not thinking of postcrete, but that could be the fastest way to do this job and as said, add a few big stones in as well. Time and weather are the factors and the mate turning up to "help"-not that he is much use, he needs a walking stick to keep upright! We have been mates for 30 odd years since I came to Wales and for a Welsh Nat he is a good man. He has been there for me when I needed a friend and I for him, but we don't live in each other's pockets, just catch up every 2 weeks or so. He had a dirty trick played across him. He was kept at home by his grand mother on the farm he was supposed to inherit but it went through an uncle first who when he died had had his will changed by the family so that they all got a cut, when he was the only one not farming due to this "b" uncle who was basically idle, but all the rest of his family had inherited their farms. Such is life.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 20 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thinking on, as I do occasionally-if I bought a bag of cement, 3 bags of sand and 4 bags of gravel, would that be the best option-mix it myself, over the "ready just add water" method? I will wait till I hear your replies that will fix it for a day or so!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38655
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 20 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

where there is a will there is a war

back bracing does make sense

where i grew up gate posts are traditionally huge bits of stone with hinges leaded into drilled holes

i spose their stability is part bulk/shape and part digging/filling skills, the ones i have seen dug out are fatter at the base than at the top

there are some stone circle stones smaller than a quarmby gatepost

with wood different parameters apply

in solid clay i would go for tight hole, backfill with watering and repeat the second bit until it was tight

in anything friable, shallow or damply unstable a big lump at the base and make it deep and wide to resist leverage makes sense

re long lasting, if you can dip the underground+ 6" of the post in tar before positioning it and concreting in it can give it an extra decade or two as it reduces the leaching of the timber preservatives

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12318

PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 20 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Postcrete is a lot quicker, but as you say, the hand mix is cheaper and gives you more time for adjustment. I would use some of the stones you got out.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 20 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thankyou MR and dpack for your advice regarding the posts to go in the ground. I will be cutting a "bulb" at the base of the hole and then some post crete and few rocks to go in as insurance! What I have discovered is that I need a longer arm as the hole needs to go down a bit more, what appeared enough depth is not enough! I will be heading that way this afternoon, all things being equal, to get going on the job. This is only the start on the tidy up, I have to complete a saw in of quite a lot of trees which have fallen over on a boundry and will be going for logs in a couple of years. Their extraction will probably involve a contractor as my Massy 35 has not the power to do such work-double rear wheels on my wet patch would be essential.

Another question is regarding timber felling. Can I actually fell Ash trees without a license? They are beginning to take over to the point that they are very large weeds, one of them is. I know about their ability to burn even when fresh, but as I have no heat I thought I may start another "branch" of my " 'umble' wood cutting empire".
A friend called yesterday and he had a shock. As a lad he was a farmer and forester, so his skill with a large chain saw is good. What he didn't know was the ability of these electric chain saws. I bought one which has a 12 inch bar, and is wonderful for felling the small trees, and trimming. He couldn't believe the way I felled a 6" diameter ash ash though it was nothing. But the best bit about them is that they are lightweight, so if you are up a tree trimming it is always ready to go and there are no cords to pull to start the machine, and if trouble arises when you are 2 miles up a thin branch, you release the safety on/off switch and it stops there and then, unlike the petrol version where the motor is still on. The only critical thing is to have 2 batteries!
Back to the post this afternoon, after another, trip to the builders merchants! According to a mate I must use a spirit level vertically-I told him mine only did flat working!

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 20 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thankyou MR and dpack for your advice regarding the posts to go in the ground. I will be cutting a "bulb" at the base of the hole and then some post crete and few rocks to go in as insurance! What I have discovered is that I need a longer arm as the hole needs to go down a bit more, what appeared enough depth is not enough! I will be heading that way this afternoon, all things being equal, to get going on the job. This is only the start on the tidy up, I have to complete a saw in of quite a lot of trees which have fallen over on a boundry and will be going for logs in a couple of years. Their extraction will probably involve a contractor as my Massy 35 has not the power to do such work-double rear wheels on my wet patch would be essential.

Another question is regarding timber felling. Can I actually fell Ash trees without a license? They are beginning to take over to the point that they are very large weeds, one of them is. I know about their ability to burn even when fresh, but as I have no heat I thought I may start another "branch" of my " 'umble' wood cutting empire".
A friend called yesterday and he had a shock. As a lad he was a farmer and forester, so his skill with a large chain saw is good. What he didn't know was the ability of these electric chain saws. I bought one which has a 12 inch bar, and is wonderful for felling the small trees, and trimming. He couldn't believe the way I felled a 6" diameter ash ash though it was nothing. But the best bit about them is that they are lightweight, so if you are up a tree trimming it is always ready to go and there are no cords to pull to start the machine, and if trouble arises when you are 2 miles up a thin branch, you release the safety on/off switch and it stops there and then, unlike the petrol version where the motor is still on. The only critical thing is to have 2 batteries!
Back to the post this afternoon, after another, trip to the builders merchants! According to a mate I must use a spirit level vertically-I told him mine only did flat working!

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 20 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thankyou MR and dpack for your advice regarding the posts to go in the ground. I will be cutting a "bulb" at the base of the hole and then some post crete and few rocks to go in as insurance! What I have discovered is that I need a longer arm as the hole needs to go down a bit more, what appeared enough depth is not enough! I will be heading that way this afternoon, all things being equal, to get going on the job. This is only the start on the tidy up, I have to complete a saw in of quite a lot of trees which have fallen over on a boundry and will be going for logs in a couple of years. Their extraction will probably involve a contractor as my Massy 35 has not the power to do such work-double rear wheels on my wet patch would be essential.

Another question is regarding timber felling. Can I actually fell Ash trees without a license? They are beginning to take over to the point that they are very large weeds, one of them is. I know about their ability to burn even when fresh, but as I have no heat I thought I may start another "branch" of my " 'umble' wood cutting empire".
A friend called yesterday and he had a shock. As a lad he was a farmer and forester, so his skill with a large chain saw is good. What he didn't know was the ability of these electric chain saws. I bought one which has a 12 inch bar, and is wonderful for felling the small trees, and trimming. He couldn't believe the way I felled a 6" diameter ash ash though it was nothing. But the best bit about them is that they are lightweight, so if you are up a tree trimming it is always ready to go and there are no cords to pull to start the machine, and if trouble arises when you are 2 miles up a thin branch, you release the safety on/off switch and it stops there and then, unlike the petrol version where the motor is still on. The only critical thing is to have 2 batteries!
Back to the post this afternoon, after another, trip to the builders merchants! According to a mate I must use a spirit level vertically-I told him mine only did flat working!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38655
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 20 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

with any trees over(iirc) 2 cu m it is worth asking if you need a felling licence

small ash is a "weed" tree, big uns no idea

it might be worth starting a conversation with the fellings department

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12318

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 20 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

If you can get onto the Forestry Commission website it will give you details but checking on the Welsh forestry site you will need a licence unless you are felling less than five cubic metres in a calendar quarter as long as no more than 2 cubic metres are sold, or the trees have the following diameters when measured 1.3 metres from the ground:
8 cm or less
10 cm or less, for thinnings
15 cm or less, for cutting coppice

You can contact them by e-mail on fellinglicence@cyfoethnaturiolcymru.gov.uk but if you need advice then ask them for it via the e-mail and they may be able to give you a phone number to talk about it or even send someone out, although that is unlikely at the moment.

Hope that covers it all for you. Have you got the double shovel we call a 'Shove holer' to make the hole for your post bigger? They are a great help although I find them rather tiring.

Electric chainsaws are very good. I first saw them at a show some years ago, and I believe they are very popular with tree surgeons, particularly those in places like London where they have to work at nigh because of traffic. For bit trees, I think petrol chainsaws still have the edge, and most fellers I know are still using petrol ones for the felling, although they might use electric for cutting up smaller branches.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2158
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 20 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thankyou for the felling license info. The tree in question is very tall and taking over. If it came down in a wind it would slice my house in half, but its saving grace is a large branch just over head height at the base and almost the same diameter as the main trunk, but on the high side. It is a professional job to fell it and in many ways a shame, but I will ask the right people thankyou, I can do without being fined. My ash is I think in the need a licence category.
What I don't know is how I fitted in the working for a living! I thought I would be short of kindling supply pallets but my local builders' merchant has come up trumps twice, and said to me to call weekly, I have just brought out 20 odd pallets in the last 2 days, very pleased all clean, thank goodness for the pickup, as they would have needed my big trailer.
I didn't get to the post hole yesterday and think I will leave it for a few weeks as kindling is becoming a rarity in my store-there is a late or early new year's resolution to come into play this time-get your wood cut and enough of it in store before I start any other project. I have difficulty saying no to people who want things done and come to me as they know I am now at home, they don't think I am retired, but that I have time to burn. Better to be busy, though, than doing nought.
I don't know if I said that I dug the hole at the base using one of those double spades-2 blades and 2 handles, saved hours of bending down to pull a handful of soil; and it was a tool left here by the previous chap-now in a coma due to enough money to buy even more drugs than when he was the owner. Oh dear.
Times up!

Back in now as I have to collect even more pallets later these are bonfire material, but I am taking them to be sure of more good ones when I need them! A quick lunch from the local Spa (as in shop not health centre). They do a salad roll for a lot of money-£3-but well done and enough to eat. My friends from Bridgnorth called to say they were off for lunch and then home, but left me a note and some food, for tonight I hope! Jill makes wonderful fruit cake and puddings. I emailed them and surprised they didn't get that whilst they were out

I unloaded the pallets from this morning and broken them up ready for some action later today to deliver tomorrow, when I hope to achieve 7 nets complete with 3 for delivery. My sales are an average of 3 a day, which alone is easy but I have other things to do in life however much I enjoy chopping wood-I have forgotten who told me there are other things in life. I do have another friend who is in my age group and we seem to be getting on, I met her through swimming for the aged,(over 60's). Anyway the pallets all under cover ready to cut. So critical to be dry. Just rushed outside to put the pallet demolisher in the cab of the pickup, I cannot afford to be without it, saves hours of hammering and broken non-square pallet boards, even so I still have to get the nails out. My first proper job was learning the pallet trade how to construct them. Now the ultimate is a massive very heavy duty magnet that will overcome the hold of the wood on the nails and whip them out in one go-I am dreaming again.

I am wondering how many of you were like me-panic stocking up on what you thought you would need if all went upside down with the virus. I have so many tins of beans and tea bags that I have decided to start eating them with a brew.

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