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Mortice joints.
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40309
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

good grained naturally dried oak is a joy to work with

oak is not as toxic as some but any fine dust is best blocked with a mask

when it is done will it be painted or oiled?

several coats of boiled linseed, start with mostly turpentine, get progressively more oily on each coat, in many ways it outperforms most paints
a bit of driers to get the time scale reasonable, permanganate ones work very well, but if you want to play with flake white rubbed into the grain when you start it is traditional and it does work

with oak if you are going to paint it as a super smooth surface, when it looks smooth raise the grain with a damp sponge , let it dry and then give it final sanding, then sand between coats

for oil raise the grain, let it dry, first thin coat of oil, then final sanding

in many ways i would prefer oil for oak, not least it looks better with age, and it is easier to maintain

oil or paint, get the first few coats on before glazing
with pegged joints if i was oiling i would give the pegs, mortices and tenons a decent covering before assembly

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12985

PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Linseed oil is regarded as a drying oil, so doesn't really need anything to get it to dry. It might take a while, but it will dry. Can't stand the smell of it myself, but it is highly thought of in green woodworking circles.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44821
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Do you need to oil ita?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

99% of the structure is 100mm oak. It’s not going anywhere before I am. The remainder is a hardwood doorframe (and maybe a door later). I don’t need to do anything to it, but I am oiling to protect it from UV / fungal staining.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

There’s not much dust as such, I’m outside in the breeze and I’m using tools that create shavings, rather than dust mostly. But yeah, I mask when I have to. Mostly. Ish.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25723
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 21 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Pics?

Nick wrote:
I’m about 2/3 done, and am simply pegging them together; no glue.


Use some mushroom dowels and you'll get a porch and a flush of shiitake every year.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun May 09, 21 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Roflmao. Funny the first year. Second year I may find the locks have been changed

Pics when I fire up the laptop.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40309
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun May 09, 21 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



oil does give an ace patina on structural exposed oak, it also prevents most boring beetle squats and stuff that will try to grow on it

100mm is a good size for that sort of thing, if i now imagine it better(i was thinking a glazed "conservatory" type thing rather than a "church porch" with windows and a door

ps if you really want a good patina melt some beeswax into the oil turpentine mix

boiled linseed oil is a drying oil, a slow drying oil
stand oil which is boiled linseed oil that gets treated to improve it and is daft expensive dries faster

driers means you can do a coat every few days rather than every few months

my sort of material from restoration and decorating and arty stuff

the last oak i played with was a piano and a fireplace that became a gas meter cupboard , 2 window sills and a hearth surround:lol:

i limed that before i gave it the multilayer turpentine, oil and wax treatment but i would not bother for structural stuff as it will develop a resistant patina, possibly over centuries, with an oiling every few years

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Progress so far.








dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40309
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

good machine for that sort of work

the slot for the top flashing will be easier before the roof is on

nice and in "the local style"

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Yeah, the flashing belongs to the roof that was already there. I am hoping to be able to repair and reuse in situ with minimal work I think I'll get some of the rafters up, to be able to create a work bench, and a scaff tower beneath. Some repair work is needed, for sure. Luckily, the new roof is just longer, not wider, so I am not anticipating too much grief. I'm incorporating some new materials in for sealing, too, which should help...

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40309
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

iirc a lead dressing stick can be had for about a tenner

nice tool for shaping sheet

depending how old that is it and how much "work" it has had may be flexible or it might be best to get a new strip and weigh that in

it should work like firm pastry

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44821
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

V nice Nick

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40309
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

re lead a few old man hints from an old man who likes the stuff for houses and arty stuff

if you need it to be waterproof for a long time the less joins the better, torch weld rolled joints are ok but not for a porch
rolls come in assorted lengths and widths

30 mm in a clean slot in the wall* back to that, 100 mm or a bit more vertical, 150 mm gently resting on the roof, 300mm code 3 should do it
(unless you are going for full welsh slating or whatever)

if you can, support the lead with a plank until the wedges are in, a few under and a few over is good if you can wrangle that, otherwise just drive the top ones in with hammer and then a fat punch

ps new is not much more expensive than scrap the old and a bit and avoids a lot of swearing

* clean slot, roll a bit of lead to maybe a 20mm roll, bat it flat, and then hammer a chisel point on the end, cut off enough length to give a wedge that will hold the flashing in the slot when hammered in

fill slot at the back, install lead, let it settle, fill top line. 1c/1l/4sss works (i do not know how long posh adhesive stuff would last)

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 21 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Yeah, our problem is that what you can see is pebble dash (thanks, previous owner) on essentially crappy lathe and plaster replacement, wafer thin stuff. 30mm in, and I'll be in the lad's bedroom

So, we keep what's there, it's worked 40+ years, we think. And underpin with some modern sticky, flexible flashing.

https://www.mcmahons.ie/universal-vent-roll-membrane-6m-with-self-adhesive-flashing sort of thing.

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