Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Mortice joints.
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY
Author 
 Message
dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40315
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

copper can have issues depending on environment

tar covered tarp is a green option, the shed roof has lasted a few years

a good lead roof will stop shedding anything significant after a few decades and will last centuries

4 to 5 hundred years is considered a decent performance, the lead to lead welds do suffer a bit of metal fatigue over a few hundred years

dressed and welded lead over an oak carcase has been known to last nearly twice that

one of the best bits of lead work, and lead, i have ever seen was roman

bridge footings, big blocks of stone, fastened together with iron staples that were hot leaded into the holes
the iron was gone after a few river twists, entombment and excavation but the lead was in perfect condition after 1700 years in a river or buried near a river

ace trade craft by the builder mason fabrication crew, stunning material quality, pity about all the dead slaves who dug and refined it(mostly to extract the silver for Caesar, lead was pretty much a waste product but could be used well or not)
bit nuanced.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6022
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Why will a lead roof eventually stop leaching lead?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40315
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ps naughty but i tried the roman lead with a thumbnail, fresh and soft as a toxic daisy and ready to work after 1700+ yrs

if it was eroding and ablating chemically i would not have met that bit of history

ps the river is peat hill fed and probably has a low Ph

as a usual thing treating any lead , metal or compound as toxic is sensible

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40315
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Slim wrote:
Why will a lead roof eventually stop leaching lead?


the weathered patina becomes a non-soluble layer on the surface, i am not sure of the chemistry, complex i suspect as a good surface takes a bluish tinge rather than silver or (ugggh) white fluffy one

i have an arty bit outside that i made from offcuts about 1995, even though it has been indoors for half of that time it has almost shed the "dandruff" and developed a grey blue patina
with no accidents it is probably permanent in the world

the surface layer becomes not soluble compounds that resist further chemical changes as they are fairly stable to "normal" conditions

complicated but a similar thing to very reactive metals being stable as the surface reacted and the inside has a shell

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

sgt.colon wrote:
That is look really good Nick.

I thought you were building yourself an outdoor bar.


No. . But I bet I can sit in it with a drink eventually.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25723
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Nick wrote:
sgt.colon wrote:
That is look really good Nick.

I thought you were building yourself an outdoor bar.


No. . But I bet I can sit in it with a drink eventually.


In an antique pewter tankard?

Porch is looking good, it's almost inspiring me to make something out of the oak I've got laying around. (Although it is still in a fallen trunk laying in my woodland...)

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I did woodwork at school, and I’m no carpenter, but it’s glorious to work with. And it smells lovely. I have a bucket of oak chips for smoking with already and I’m about half way through. If the sun shines tomorrow I’ll get the third wall done. Then fix the lead and measure for glazing. Rafters. Window frames. Felt, battens and tiles and we’re finished....

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25723
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I always think fresh cut oak smells mildly of horse radish, definitely a lovely smell.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44821
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We e just been cutting oak sleepers for flower beds. We thought it smelt like cow shit

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34529
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Your cows need to see a vet.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25723
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 21 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

tahir wrote:
We thought it smelt like cow shit


It may have been Turkey Oak, I gather that can smell a bit whiffy.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12991

PostPosted: Wed May 12, 21 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

British Turkey Oak isn't regarded as any good for timber, but no idea if imported might be good for sleepers. We sometimes get ash that has rot in it that smells like cow pats; we call it cow poo ash.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40315
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed May 12, 21 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

mend the ship with red oak

when folk say oak do they mean Chichewa or Rottie

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44821
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed May 12, 21 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
British Turkey Oak isn't regarded as any good for timber, but no idea if imported might be good for sleepers. We sometimes get ash that has rot in it that smells like cow pats; we call it cow poo ash.


They were appalling quality wise, they haven't got a lot of work to do so we've used the best of them. No idea on source, there was hardly anyone with stock last week.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12991

PostPosted: Thu May 13, 21 7:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

There still seem to be some shortages periodically.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
Page 4 of 4
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com