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tis a tool thing for chainsaw sharpening
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Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34535
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 21 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

https://www.radmoretucker.co.uk/shop/garden-machinery/chainsaws-tree-care/chainsaw-sharpening-equipment/oregon-filing-guide/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw5PGFBhC2ARIsAIFIMNfxZ6nsEyxhBLpAKLM8pbW7gB11VPZzBRqMVYh_7QYFPFJ2fvFOIXQaAi-fEALw_wcB

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 21 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

thanks, Oregon filing guide

a name makes shopping easier

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 21 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

You only need a vice to hold the middle of the chainsaw and a chainsaw sharpening file which is a round file. It is what we use, but you do need to know how to use them properly, otherwise all the other kit is probably the best bet. I assume by now that you know what you are doing as you have all limbs and digits intact.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6040
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 21 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I really like the roller guide. I think I've used it enough that I know have a better chance of freehand sharpening successfully, should I need to.

I've never used a voice on the bar, but my Husqvarna is pretty heavy, and doesn't really move about on me that much when I sharpen.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 21 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i have a vague idea and all my limbs, making every tooth the exact angle is much easier with the clamp guide thing

for many tools i use some sort of honing guide, even if it is my hand pressure along the bench or blade

for any sort of saw i need a guide or a very long time and maybe a new saw blade
i can just about manage a carpenter's cross-cut freehand(plenty of practice) but owt else needs a guide or a mr man and his magic machines

double on that for chainsaw chains, especially if adjusting them to the timber being cut
my tutor made quite a point( ) of using the correct profiles for the job (cherry is different to larch etc) and regular setting for a clean, safe, effective cut does make life easier and longer for machine and user

ps in extremis, rip cut a vertical slot into a convenient stump, add two small two twig wedges= woodsperson's filing bench with a vice and the only sharpening tool needed is a file

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 21 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

In the woods, as you say, improvisation is the key. Most saws are heavy enough to stand stable, but better to clamp them in some way if possible.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 2201
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 21 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I just use a round file for the size of the blade and your local chain saw shop will/should tell you the size and off you go and buy one from wherever you want to. I bought a saw and it came with 2 files. I have found one thing a small electric chain saw is much lighter and much quieter than messing about with petrol and mixing it up, and the electric saw starts every time for me and no ache in my arms! I have a lot of big planks to cut up just to get it in the pickup and it is fast and as I say easy-on off switch and a trigger to start the blade. 2 batteries last a day at least when I am cutting and carting timber, mainly pallets.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 21 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We recently bought an electric chainsaw, and while it isn't good for cutting large trees, it is ideal for smaller work, coppice and cutting up odd things. I don't use chainsaws as even the electric one terrifies me (best to have a healthy respect for dangerous things, not outright fear imo) but husband finds it a great deal easier as he is finding a petrol one a bit heavy these days. They are expensive, but worth the investment if you are doing smaller work.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Jul 17, 21 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

breakfast with lemmy not scary etc

chainsaws very scary

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25726
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Jul 17, 21 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Like most things, if you work your way up after a bit of training then chainsaws seem fine. Possibly not worth dwelling on the fact many saws will slice right through protective clothing...

Many accidents seem to be down to improper use of top handle saws as far as I can see.

I do like my battery Stihl for light work but I still use my petrol saws for anything large, especially ash. Probably time to buy a decent pro-felling saw to deal with all the large ash trees that will need to be cleared.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

my big husky is fine for anything up to about 3 feet across(with a bit of beever style) and will drop a 2 footer easily

so far i have found no timber wet or dry that it cannot eat

even with cat3 ppe i am very aware of not making errors

i do not use it often, that means reminding myself of the issues when i do, spose that is the flipside to using one every day and getting casual

of all the scary things i have worked or played with chainsaws are in the top few for be really careful
(that includes finding out how fast you can add NAPS to a reaction mass without the temp going over 2 degrees C and dying when the building changes shape)

my best chainsaw advice is spend a lot of money for a week training and then be very careful, i still have all my parts so i would say that

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I would certainly agree that training and correct PPE are essential. It worries me that some shops, and online, will sell chainsaws without even mentioning the PPE, let alone training.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

last week SD and SIL mentioned an extended relly had just bought a cheapo "domestic" saw from somewhere.
they understood my reaction and explanations

best i have seen was a 9 foot pole with a 12 " bar on the top and a wee engine at the bottom
£87 , "good for high branches", "ideal for garden use", "comes with hedge trimmer attachment"

it is difficult to know where to start with that

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 21 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We have one similar, but it is naturally treated with great respect. Very good for taking down small branches that are in a dangerous position, but definitely not for an amateur without training and PPE. Branches are cut back a foot or two at a time. Anything more difficult needs our pet tree surgeon to climb the next tree over to do the removal.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 21 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

my first dismantle was a 60ft poplar in a confined space by free climbing with a saw when i was about ten

i did a tidy job, the bits landed well and i survived

things were different in the 1960's

do what i say not what i did is good advice about me

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