Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
sticks and tings

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Recipes, Preserving, Homebrewing
Author 
 Message
dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 7:36 am    Post subject: sticks and tings Reply with quote
    



as i have a wok that works, i got some cooking sticks and some eating sticks, nice ones.

considering that juggling a matchbox between a pair in each hand was a party trick a long while back, trying to use them to grab anything was funny for the first few mins.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I am sure they make perfect sense in the far east, but I have never understood why anyone would use chopsticks. In the west we went from just knives to knives and spoons and then finally forks. I must admit that trying to catch things like peas 'politely' on the end of a fork is rather counter intuitive, but even worse with chopsticks.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

peas and sticks works, lift the bowl

for ages they were a normal utensil, the old muscle memory will return

big uns are ace for stir frying and grilling, non scratch in a wok and ideal for a quick flip

for eating little uns work well, with no knife they can be improvised if needs be, if you have a knife cut food before cooking and use less fuel

they make more sense than"fish knives" or "cake forks" with an alleged single purpose

ps sycamore would be a nice wood for cooking size, my new ones are bamboo but etc

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 21 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sycamore is ideal for most cooking and eating utensils. It is non staining, non tainting and has some antiseptic properties. It used to be used extensively in the dairy, the laundry and the kitchen. If we ever come up that way again, I will try to bring you a log or two as a present.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jul 19, 21 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

thank you.

it is common in west yorkshire as it is ace for making rollers, as used in the early water powered textile machines, and even into the early steam age

not many in york, the maples are well represented in similar niches here

maple might work for kitchen tools, it has good grain and works ok
have you ever tried it?

i had a couple of dry fallen ones for fire wood in derbyshire, it did split into disposable plates easily, at the time we considered utensils but never tried it.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13122

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 21 7:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I have made spoons out of field maple, and that works all right. I think most hardwoods have some antiseptic properties, and probably some softwoods too. At least, I have been using a pine chopping board for 40 odd years that was off the end of the stairs we installed in our first house, and none of us have got food poisoning yet.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40656
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 21 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    


Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Recipes, Preserving, Homebrewing All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com