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tidy use of timber
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44849
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 21 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The mosque is great, I was lucky enough to get a guided tour from the architect, and it's built to passive house standards too.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40930
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 21 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



tis one of the best uses of engineered laminated timber beams i know of so far

the more i looked, the better it looked

the energy and hvac stuff being as good as the look of the spaces is not a surprise, a very splendid building

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44849
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 21 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

A very well thought out building in terms of how it interacts with it's neighbourhood too. Julia really understood the challenges and I think created a brilliant solution.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40930
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 21 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

the only downside i can see is it might need a duster on a long stick for the crevices

totally beautiful, big span can work but using the "trees" as part of the "open space" is delightful

respect, more of this sort of thing

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13265

PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 21 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

That is a beautifully designed building. I agree with you Tahir, that it looks as if it blends in well in all directions. The architect understands the material, and the use of curves, which seem anathema to most architects. Laminated (I assume) and bent wood is a wonderful building medium as it can be used in curves. It continues the tradition in the UK and Europe of using wood for arches in roofs, except they were usually covered in stone. The timber is still there in many cases hence the devastating fires in several cathedrals. In those cases, the timber wasn't laminated, but grown and/or selected for the purpose. The only thing is that I would agree about the cleaning. Any exposed beams are going to be a pain to clean.

Looking at a number of the other ones, it is such a pity that the architects go for the square and the modern, particularly in places where the continuation of the existing style would be so much more sympathetic.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7377
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 21 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The mosque is beautiful and technically more than a step further on from the laminated wood catenary arch village hall in Borehamwood we saw in 1987 for a Rixon gathering of 100+.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13265

PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 21 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

You must either have a very large family or have collected them from all over the world. I thought the Canadian branch of my family was pretty large, but you have certainly outdone them by a very large margin.

There has been a lot of work done on laminated wood recently. There is the Gridshell building at the Weald and Downland Museum at Singleton in Sussex, which I don't find particularly attractive, but at least uses curves and fulfills it use as a downstairs store and upstairs exhibition/ large work area with no obstructions in the floor space, and there was another we saw further over in Sussex that was one of the first I believe, that has been up for some years. Neither of them is a patch on that mosque though.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7377
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 21 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Grandad was one of the nine babes that survived to adulthood....

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13265

PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 21 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Your grandparents did very well then. My mother was one of 7 and 4 survived to full adult hood with one other dying I think in her late teens or early 20s. They did live in London though. Two of them died of things that could be cured or prevented by vaccination these days. Having lost a sister to diphtheria, Mum had me fully vaccinated for all the things available at that time. I think I was one of the first generation to have that available to them.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7377
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 21 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

There were 13.
One full set of twins died, two half sets of twins died.
Also in London. Blackstock Road Islington

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13265

PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 21 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

My mother was brought up in Forest Gate. She claimed to be a Cockney, but Dad said the wind would have to be blowing a gale in the right direction for her to be one.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7377
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 21 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    


tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44849
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 21 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

My dad's first house was in Forest Gate, but we were brought up in Whitechapel

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27299
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Tue Sep 14, 21 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Belatedly to the thread, that is an amazing building

Reminds me of NOT of the Millennium Dome, a building designed to last till the end of humanity, or about 30 years which ever comes sooner

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13265

PostPosted: Tue Sep 14, 21 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Small world Tahir. My grandparents move further out later, and when Mum and Dad were going out together, Dads parents lived in north west London, so he could recite the names of the tube stations right across between them for years.

As you say Jema, most modern structures don't seem built to last, but sadly the architects don't think about how they are to be deconstructed. Some of the 'iconic' things in London like the falling over old fashioned mobile phone, the gherkin (or space rocket as I see it), that broken Shard thing etc. are going to be brutes to take down without doing damage around them. The probably won't last too long and need to be demolished , possibly even within my lifetime. I know they had fun with the Tricorn in Portsmouth. They should have let the Navy loose on it; they would have flattened it easily enough.

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