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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 21 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i was not trying, they photobombed a bit of sky i am surprised at the detail in the full fat version
one good(imho and stuff anyone else, 5 yrs at art school honed my don't care i like it) arty snap, loads of postcard style wasters nice ones but not my thing even if folk like postcard snaps
i was not after seaside wildlife, i takes more than a few days to get settled in to critter world and plenty of observation to choose good spots

i got a few birds, something black and white duck shape red bill? cute quite small, i will find that and id the thing, the snaps are not portrait but will do for id
the brown things hiding in the seaweed are in the snaps but i cant find them yet, ace cammo 30 m many of them and invisible against rocks and seaweed

the big lens would be best for critters, another couple of delicate kilos to haul about but....

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 21 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Someone posted a picture of frogs and toads on a FB page, and I still can't find the animal in one picture, although I am pretty observant. It either wandered off while they were taking the picture, or it is extremely well camouflaged.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 21 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



i have had professional hide and seek training, some critters are far better than any humans

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 21 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



a microdot on the image, probably enough for id

funky wee critters, hiding with a flag

the brown ones are still hiding with no flags

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 21 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Can possibly make out two more on the left of the picture, but can't be sure. As you say; well camouflaged.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7429
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 21 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sorry no pictures.. couldn't get near enough, we had flocks of Fieldfares in the hedges and fields on our walk today.
Plus blackbirds, thrushes, bluetits, robins. Oddly no goldfinches as there have been loads in that hedgerow lately

Looks like Winter is kicking in in earnest

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 21 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

It certainly seems to be here. Although we aren't getting the worst of the storm, it is very windy and cold this morning with a threat we may get a little snow at some point.

After a rather over zealous cull of the roe deer in the woods, we saw 3 the other day. Either they kept their heads down and haven't ventured out for a few weeks, or they have come in from elsewhere.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 21 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

thanks, you reminded me to warm up the bambi stew for lunch

nice critters, but with no wolves leading to loads of em they can get a bit too chewy on things like trees and exceed the capacity of their environment to support that many

no wolves requires a sniper or an rta node( a crossing point is ace for carrion forage )
if i was younger sneaking up on them for a personal intervention would be plausible

waste not etc

that might seem harsh but getting a basically functional environment from where we are taking up the problems needs "us" to do the things our forebears disrupted

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 21 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Agree. The normal deer population in the woods is what I describe as the high end of acceptable. We have to fence coppice as otherwise the deer think the nice people have brought deer munchies down to an easy level for them, but we have plenty of natural regeneration, so the deer don't affect the woodland too much. We have roe and some muntjac, but luckily only the occasional fallow passing through and no herds. No other species as far as I am aware have been seen round here. I have seen a wood which was described as 'sticks in the sand' where there was no natural regen or ground flora. I am glad to say that since then they have controlled the deer and last time I saw it there was plenty of new trees etc. coming on.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 21 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

young mr bracket has one dark spot left on a fine orange beak and a delightfully dark and shiny suit
as far as i have noticed, he is the only one about, the ms brackets set off to find new lands and mr and mrs brack were looking a little "elderly" when i last saw either of them quite a while ago
3 clutches and 5 fledged with 4 to adult is rather hard work even with lots of food provided, year before they did 2 clutches

hammi and sammi sammison are busy storing grain and seeds, hammi seems to have less tail than she did, i have no idea if that is medical or biting
at the mo she could greet a guineapig by calling it "waggy"

the tweed genes are now in spawn 3 mode, they are sparrows but they do look like a different species and show different behaviours although they do handmaid to dominant nests of close relatives
afaik they have not bred so far, but it is possible a sly egg was popped out under a queen and a fitztweed got a palace education

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 21 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Went up to the woods yesterday to check after the storm. With snow on the ground it made it easier to see long distances, particularly as nearly all the leaves are down now. On the way in we saw a roe deer; they don't seem the least bit bothered by passing vehicles, so it just stood and looked at us. Now in winter dark coat. Found the tree we had been told about is the top of a pollard, and one that has been on the way out for years, so not unexpected. It fell away from the footpath, unfortunately taking out the entire top of an oak tree in its fall. Hope fully the oak will survive. Fully on the ground, so although it will take a fair bit of dissecting including some winching, we can deal with it ourselves without calling in climbers.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 21 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

As I posted above, saw 4 roe deer yesterday in the woods, all in winter coats. Also spent some time sitting quietly and had visitations by the robin, plus another that tried to use its feeding station and got seen off. Also bluetits in the trees, a jay, probably a buzzard overhead, although couldn't see the tail clearly enough to tell if it was a kite or buzzard, but buzzards are more common. Heard the magpies kicking up a row as usual, and plenty of pigeons about. By the look of the feathers I have seen, buzzards, sparrohawks or others are enjoying them for dinner too.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 21 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

roe are fun, they cover quite large distances, following them is interesting and usually a very nice walk. it helps having a couple of hounds and a couple of spaniels who will sniff but not chase to do the heavy lift tracking until you get to a fresh trail, then it is a matter of staying far enough away not to scare them and close enough to observe them.

creeping up on reds while they shelter from weather is a game i used to play in the mountains, sneak among them and lie still with them is strange, and i have been told it is probably quite dangeroos by an amazed keeper/gillie.
the last time i did it, they did not notice me until they stood up to move
ps sneaking and parking with dogs is probably very difficult, the yellow one was good at people and many critters, but deer are rather good at not being eaten, so we kept to a few hundred yards unless we got too close by accident which was usually follow over.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 7429
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 21 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We saw a roebuck in Hannahston reserve yesterday afternoon.
There has been a few people with dogs so we didn't expect anything.
He was in the open, about 70 yards from us and ten from the edge of the trees.
As he was downwind from us we expected him to dash off. He looked up, assessed us... obviously thought "Nae Dug"....and carried on eating for five minutes before looking at us again and mooching off into the trees 😎🙂❤️

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 21 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

nice

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