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Upping the power tool ante
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jema
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 27368
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 21 4:57 pm    Post subject: Upping the power tool ante Reply with quote
    

Came across this today

https://www.bosch-professional.com/gb/en/procore18v/?gclid=CjwKCAiAnO2MBhApEiwA8q0HYQAJ3pGL7msToi9Jsb6CbcUWkpxCuzEE7iGulz0P23oie7PMEBC7WRoCKTwQAvD_BwE

Seems another solid step upwards in what battery tools can do via better battery tech.
I recall the wow factor about 5 years ago of investing in my first Ryobi One 18V drill compared to the 12V crap I had.
I now have rather a collection of Ryobi bits, but still a corded power drill, SDS drill as backup.
By the looks of that link, the nail is pretty much in the coffin for corded.

sean
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 42162
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 21 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Corded will be significantly cheaper for a good long while and less bother for the casual/light user I think.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 21 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

milwarkee sds/drill/light breaker+ drill driver, usa made ones with new batteries and a new demolition saw in over a decade with some hard use
the newer machines are not as strong even if motors are better, newer batteries are ace

28V is nice and they charge about as quickly as i can drill holes

everything else has a wire, powerful and cheap has merit for now and again use, quite a mix of brands but all industrial grade bargains,
best buy was an unlabled circular saw 20 yrs ago, ace tool very strong and still on the original blade, it just wont go blunt or shed a tooth

re beasty stuff a decent husky engine top trumps a battery, iirc my big saw is about 5 hp

i have killed a lot of tools, the ones i keep are the strong ones, darwin could have come to a similar conclusion poking about in tool boxes

makita are pretty good value for basic mid size industrial like breakers
my east ?german stuff is rather soviet in style but it is strong and it was cheap

Re older tools and battery packs, decent ones have batteries that can have new cells fitted in the pack or there are replacement packs brand or generic available, i recon that and maybe the odd bearing etc can extend life of industrial to the extent it is far cheaper than killing loads of domestic or"cheap" ones

a selection of tools that fit the same batteries is sensible

Treacodactyl
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Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25750
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 21 9:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Upping the power tool ante Reply with quote
    

jema wrote:
By the looks of that link, the nail is pretty much in the coffin for corded.


Depends on what you do. For a tradesman working on site they will be great but they've been working with them for years and will probably just mean a few less spare batteries.

For your average DIYer, they will probably not mean much other than some bragging rights. I went down to the Bosch 12v range a few years ago 'cos I got fed up of wielding a large drill when I didn't need such a weighty battery and drill.

As for progress, when there's one range of batteries that power everything from Stihl chainsaws, Husqy brush cutters and DeWalt drills and even cars that's when we have progress. Now we just end up with a vast range of incompatible chargers, batteries and tools.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 21 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

It will probably come Treacodactyl. When computers came down to desktop size the computer would only talk to its own printer (if you were lucky) and other bits of kit but now they are fairly universal.

We have gone for an electric chainsaw for light work. Pricey, but far easier to use I understand and far lighter. As you say Dpack, if you are going to be doing anything other than light DIYing, getting a good power tool that will last is far better than killing several light ones.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 7152
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 21 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I still use my B&D hammer drill that I bought in the early 90's. That is chorded and I've not used a chordless drill that is as good as it. I can't remember what wattage it is though. 900 is floating in my mind for some reason.

Lord of the batteries would be a great step forward though.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44881
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 21 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We';ve bought a Stihl strimmer, much less faff than a petrol one. Will add a chainsaw when we can afford it

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 21 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i have, probably, a 1.5kw corded drill, perfect for mixing plaster, no fun as a drill, wires are a pita

wires on site should be 110v and decent commando leads, 230v wires have issues especially if melting skinny extension leads with a decent size tool a distance from the plug or enough boot bites in a puddle

chop saw is ok with a wire, drills not so much even big uns
i had a moment with a big 3 kv wire fed drill 15v ft up a tower scaff. going round was not as disturbing as getting wrapped by the snake

small breakers are best with a wire and 110v, big cutters are best battery or ice

compressed air is nice but a whole new game

ditto the stuff that works on pto and hydraulics

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 21 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

If you work with corded power tools outside you should always have an earth leakage circuit breaker so that it trips out in case of something going wrong.

As you say Dpack, PTO driven is a whole new game, but we use them all the time in the woods, and treated with respect and understanding, and ensuring the safety cut outs etc. are in good working order, they can be perfectly safe if used properly. For our little tractor we do have the B&D syndrome where we have a number of tools that attach to it, and sometimes it is a bit tricky setting up when several jobs need doing.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25750
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 21 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
It will probably come Treacodactyl.


I remain sceptical. I also have a little cordless Stihl chainsaw, the domestic version. It's very good for light work and I've bought the hedge cutter from the range so I can swap batteries. It's a shame they don't make a torch that goes with the batteries as that would be ideal for powercuts and evening working.

I've been looking at the top of the range Stihl battery saw but not only is it expensive but my Stihl batteries don't fit, let alone any other makes.

If I needed a large number of tools and a decent battery I'd look at one of those 'battery' generator things.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44881
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 21 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
PTO driven is a whole new game, but we use them all the time in the woods


We have a PTO driven chipper, brilliant

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6113
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 21 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Just my usual post to be extra cautious around electric chainsaws, as their very high torque causes them to tear through safety chaps that would otherwise stop gasoline powered saws.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13446

PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 21 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I don't know what yours are like Slim, but the one we have has the advantage that when you release the handle it stops almost instantly. We always wear safety trousers and helmet when using a chainsaw anyway. I don't use any chainsaw as I am frightened of them, rather than wary, which everyone should be.

Generally I hate power tools but see that they make life an awful lot easier and enable us to work more efficiently. We started by cutting firewood with a chainsaw and hand splitting with an axe. At most, the three of us could manage 2 loads a day, both in time and energy. Now we can easily do 3 and are only really limited by delivery time from doing more, even though we are 20 years older.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41288
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 21 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

my chainsaw is beasty, so is the c3 ppe, i am probably more likely to die of heatstroke than hypo systemic shock

re dangeroos power tools hand held circular saw gets high votes from site and A and E chums from st thomas's who referred to them as bank holiday gelding tongs
i am very careful slicing boards

9" or 12 " industrial leccy angle grinders are a bit frisky and skittery unless handled with a lot of care, the gyroscope twist is interesting with some,
the better modern ones have electronic slow start which helps, unless you move with it running such as swerving a lump you just sliced off

anything that cuts wood will be good at cutting people, some behave better than others

screw tip auger bits are surprisingly nasty

joinery workshop kit is cat 4 careful, the more industrial the safer it is as a rough rule, all can mangle big style

etc, we have lasted this long, why we have should be shared

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8930
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 21 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The main point of battery tools, imho, is when you want to work where there is no power supply, which is most of my place.
I'm a dewalt woman, when it comes to drill and jigsaw. True they are heavier and you have to remember to charge in advance, but I can carry to outbuildings with no power and use.

Similarly my garden is too long for extensions leads, and we use Bosch battery operated lawnmower and strimmer. Battery power has comes a long way.

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