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nofence electric fencing
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Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34535
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Presumably they learn that the noise comes five paces before the shock so they end up avoiding the line they shouldn’t cross.

I can see the benefits.

I also like the fact that they’re suggesting, it’s better than fencing or WOLVES in Sussex. Fencing is a viable alternative. Wolves? Sussex? I can see the odd issue with them being used to prevent cattle movement.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13576

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

No, wolves in Sussex isn't a goer for sure. From the article it seems as if it works. I don't think the idea is for them to be put on one bit of grazing than another as in strip grazing, but more to keep them to areas that need grazing at a certain time then move them to another area some distance away.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6147
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

What if you put collars on the wolves?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41513
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

dpack" blah blah is that ok?"

Vet "looks like a dog to me cos it acts like a dog, tis a dog "

they are ok in the north, mr urbane on a train is a bit different to wild wood time but ron was pretty good at wild or pastoral as well.


woofs joining in with the lewes bonfires might be a bit much for such gentle souls

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6147
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We had an invisible electric fence collar for my dog growing up. It was occasionally an issue when she'd chase something and go through it, and then post-adrenaline was too afraid to come back through to our side. I could imagine that being a problem for either predator or prey that is outfitted.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6147
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 21 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

But yes she learned that the beeping denoted the boundary, and she couldn't have been much smarter than a cow

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13576

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 21 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I hadn't heard about them for dogs. I know there were collars that gave a small shock to dogs if they roamed too far from their owner, but not ones that beeped as a warning. I think wolves in a pack might just ignore the collars if they started hunting in a pack, and as you say Slim, not come back.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6147
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 21 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

This was not as sophisticated as these gps ones, but pretty convenient if you have an American style yard. Simply bury a wire around the perimeter of the area you want the dog to have free access too, and the collar must have known how close it was because of the strength of the small radio signal coming from the wire, or something like that. You could adjust the distance from the wire that the collar would start beeping (I'm guessing it was just increasing the power being fed to the wire). If the dog got too close it would get a shock, but you could also switch it to only beep once the dog knew to obey the beep.
We felt bad about the shocking, but the traditional dog run meant the dog was almost strangling herself regularly when wrapped around trees.
There was a day when we put the range up too high, without realizing and the poor dog was hugging the side of the house to go pee because extra steps away from it would cause her collar to beep. (She got extra treats and love that day and many apologies)
We didn't even use the collar for the last half of her life, as the boundary was just engrained and she no longer had puppy walkabout habits.
Another interesting quirk of the technology was the need to have an imaginary gate where she could be trained to know it was safe to walk through with one of us (& her collar off) to take her out for daily walks (to areas where we could let her run free and boy did she run), vet appointments, etc.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13576

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 21 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sounds useful for a large garden (or yard to you). Not many people in the UK have that much land, and certainly dogs tying themselves in knots is a well known problem even here. One method I have heard of is to have the dog on a chain or longish lead attached to a line running down the garden fairly high up, so the dog can run up and down and a little from side to side with the chain on its collar running along the line.

NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4384
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 21 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Hi all!

Dropping in to DS on a quiet afternoon and stumbled across this thread.

I've got some of these. In theory very good, lots of advantages over traditional electric fences (notably no barrier to returning to their "enclosure" after an escape - they don't get warned or shocked)

But the company have not disclosed all issues and I have enough minor troubles that I'm going to try and return them for a refund (ha!).

C'est la vie...

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 41513
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 21 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

hi, nice to see you posting

tech report is interesting, not up to the job is unfortunate, the concept seems sensible

NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4384
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 21 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Folk in England seem to have all positive reports, I still think it could be a game changer on uplands/ plains.

However, I'm under trees in deepest Wales

Much more sensible design in New Zealand places the solar panels on the neck strap so they actually face the sun...

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13576

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 21 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Yes, I can see if they are solar powered that could be a very great problem under trees. Cattle move through trees and browse them so of course wouldn't get enough sun to keep them charged. The answer seems to be ones with a battery that can be easily changed, although not so convenient.

NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4384
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 21 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

The batteries are supposed to clip in and out, but nobody with me was able to do it. Took a sort of clamp-between-knees-and-curse approach

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13576

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 21 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Changing the batteries is one thing; controlling the sheep is another. Not the easiest of operations. I know what you mean about solar power in woodland as we have the same trouble trying to top up the batteries to run the lights in the hut in the wood.

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