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Posting Pictures of Wild Foods to Identify
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42957
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 17 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

me too, they do look very crabby from most directions.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 8010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 17 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I posed this on a Wild plant i.d.group on fb..the consensus there is that they are true wild crab apples.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 2408
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 17 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thorny Wild Crabapple Species

The European crabapple (Malus sylvestris), native to the Ireland and the United Kingdom, is dense and thorny, growing from 15 to 18 feet high. Most of the crabapple trees seen in the U.K. and Ireland are hybrids between wild crabapple trees and domestic trees. True wild European crabapple trees are rare. The American crabapple (M. coronaria), native to the Midwest and Eastern United States, known for its pink and white blossoms, is a dense snarl of thorny branches growing up to 25 feet tall.

Native Habitat and Thorny Growth

European and American crabapples often have multiple trunks, and their interiors are often dead from the lack of sun penetrating the thorny snarl of their crowns. The European crabapple is found in areas of native scrub in older woodlands. American crabapple trees like moist, well-drained soils and typically grow at the edges of woodlands and fields. Their tangle of crisscrossing, thorny branches make them useful for growing as hedgerows.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 8010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 22 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I am not sure if this is edible more than once!
Anyone know it's name?

It is on an old beech stump

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42957
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 22 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    


dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42957
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 22 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

not sure what it is, chickens usually have the colours the other way round, ie pale at the edges
those with the name are varied and that looks rather like a southern USA one in the pictures

most things on trees will not kill you, some are good eating

cute shroom though i might not go yum without more research

what texture does it have? smell? raw toxicity results?

it looks promising, only feeding half the village will be a decent test

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 7351
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 22 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I found these growing down the allotment. I've never seen them before. Are they crabbers?

Thanks.



gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 8010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 22 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Looks like it...cut one in half..if it looks like a mini apple....it is!!

They will make a beautiful pink apple jelly..which also tastes good

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 42957
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 22 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

they look rather like crabs, the crab walk near here has about 50 types some look very similar to those
section? smell/taste? recipes

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 14364

PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 22 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Agree with Gz and Dpack. As Gz says they will make a good crab apple jelly.

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 7351
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 22 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Thank you GZ, DPack and MR. I'll slice one in half the next time I pop down there.

Exciting times if they are, there are loads on the bush/tree.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 8010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 22 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

gz wrote:
I am not sure if this is edible more than once!
Anyone know it's name?

It is on an old beech stump

I have had a suggestion on a post I did elsewhere...a rather old Chicken in the Woods?

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 14364

PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 22 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

It might be. Chicken of the woods is rather yellow and that looks rather pink on my computer. The colour will change with age of course.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6362
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 22 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

They do get to looking a bit like that when they're old, though the volcano architecture is a touch different than typical sulfur shelf. As dpack has said, it has a firm similar to very close relative (I think its specific epithet is something along the lines of "cinnamon" )

I think that discontent may just be a bit too old to tell what it is easily (and too old for good eating anyway). Good candidate for checking on earlier in the season next year

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 8010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 22 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Agreed Slim...even if just for a better image!!

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