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pans for induction hobs
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

cast iron is fine:wink:
steel is good, very good
laminated heavy base are ok for wet things as usual but are still just as useless for proper stir frying

the steel wok is good

it was my good fortune to meet mr tsui when he was doing form at the end of my street, by the siv, one morning, i asked to join in and we both knew what we were doing
after that whenever i went for takeaways and he taught me how to make it

a few years ago i saw him in a documentary, he was back in china, 100 yrs old and still looking 40 yrs younger and very kick ass

good cook and nice tutor

ps understanding sticks has many advantages

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

induction and a good wok is ace

boiling stuff is easy

steady poaching is easy

etc

i like these things, apart from the teeth aspect

Nicky cigreen



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9663
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I like the induction hob - I was reluctant to move over but it has been ace - I like that you can turn it down to a much lower temp then you can with gas. also leaning over does not catch hair on fire - always a bonus.

not had problem re dental as have all own teeth

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

not on fire is good

watching ren cooking chips in a wok, on a birch fire, under a leaky tarp, in a forest. was tense

now i know how to warm a pan*, this seems fairly safe and very precise in control

*the it will take a while thing did lead to a minor oil fire, i know better now

they are different to other hobs and need different kit and style
very energy efficient is nice, most of the input makes hot metal in the pan unlike most other heat sources
as is the rapidly adjustable and easily made steady fierceness of heat

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 21 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i will report on the steel crepe pan which arrived

chapati time was my first plan

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 21 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

update

the mapp blowlamp is ace, all are well seasoned
doing that on a domestic electric hob would be tricky and potentially messy

the "crepe" pan is ace for crepe, but very hot with a wet cloth works perfectly for chapatis

after the option of selling me to a restaurant as they were nice was suggested, i was asked if there had been a "cloth incident"

well yes, that is how to do it etc

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 04, 21 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

it is very nice to be able to use blued steel pans again

they are a faff, no dishwasher mucky cloths blowlamp gas etc, so what they are ace

very good on an induction hob, even better than on gas or fire, they are ace on those but less adjustable

odd that old tech is perfect for rather new tech, there have been pan abominations between steel and steel
1970's Al with Teflon frying pan 1950's Al and Alzheimer's fruit pans, le cruset powerlifting kit that fails in interesting thermal stress test ways

glass ones? just why? cos you could? try using em they are horrible

hob pans have been a very mixed bunch over my lifetime, if i had known about induction hobs i would have kept the cast iron skillet


laminated base stainless steel are ok and easy, but not good for some things, like pancakes or burgers or chapatis or roasted nuts or .......

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15277

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 21 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We started with teflon coated aluminium, but before we were married, I had been using the aluminium pans my parents had when they married in 1947. Must say the milk pan was the best I have ever used. Since then I have gone onto Le Creuset saucepans, which are lasting very well, and a stainless steel preserving pan ditto. Frying pans are more difficult, and haven't yet got the ideal. Started by cooking on electricity, but have been using gas for the last 40 years as the cooker was in the house when we bought it. Not at all sure about these induction hobs, but we are all supposed to go for them eventually, although my preference is still for a wood burning stove.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 23 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

if one needs to blue the steel, holding it close to but not touching the hob seems to work rather well

the holding and fumes might not bother many, both can be overcome

this induction heating is a bit new to me, it has merit when understood,
it was seeing industrial stuff on telly that clued me up to holding the pan half an inch over the hob would be ideal to get it hot with no stress on the hob surface

NorthernMonkeyGirl



Joined: 10 Apr 2011
Posts: 4560
Location: Peeping over your shoulder
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 23 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Induction is very useful sorcery, anything magnetic seems to work on them. Take a fridge magnet out when buying a new pan - may not be marked as suitable for induction but may actually be fine.

The cheapy plug-in ones are fine, though mine didn't quite go low enough for a steady gentle simmer.
Currently got a speedy electric one, not induction but not the old slow raised circle version either. Does very nicely.
I like the responsiveness of gas but the thought of a leak or catching hair and sleeves on fire* means I wouldn't choose to install gas.

*has happened before now

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15277

PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 23 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I was used to the very slow electric solid rings (cooker circa 1947) when with my parents, then radiant rings when we got married. We had a built in gas cooker when we moved here, and still have gas. We still use gas but rather less of late as we are using the air fryer and microwave more.

All the hobs I have used are rather good if you know how to use them. The oldest ones you turned off several minutes before the cooking was finished, so cooking cabbage was more or less bring it to the boil then turn off soon after. As I have cast iron pots (was planning on having wood burning cooker, but can't see it happening now), I still use this method to some extent.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6495
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 23 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Our cast iron is happy and highly effective on the wood stove or on the induction range. The latter is certainly easy mode, and you have even more precise control than a gas range.

Most new pots and pans are clearly labeled these days, but iron is iron, even when it's enamelled

Nicky cigreen



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 9663
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 23 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Slim wrote:
Our cast iron is happy and highly effective on the wood stove or on the induction range.


yep

and I will often switch between the two - maybe bringing to the boil faster on the induction, then moving to the stove, or switching the other way as suits.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 44861
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 23 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

induction has been surprisingly good and the easiest energy for pan cooking i have tried

one set of pans for induction and wood is quite nice

my superlight stainless camping pans might be a bit challenging to fry in on the induction hob

re al pans , i got a stainless steel disc with tiny feet on one side to
pop on hob and use like an improved heavy ring or stove top. it works fine for the al pressure cooker

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 15277

PostPosted: Tue Oct 31, 23 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

When we have the fire going I use it for long slow cooks. Bring to the boil on the gas hob then put it on the fire.

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