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Deedee



Joined: 10 Jan 2005
Posts: 250
Location: Surrey
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 12:37 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

SparklyWellies wrote:
I'm struggling with the concept of sewing for pleasure

Any tips on not sewing name tapes to your thumb gratefully received

Buy iron on ones
great quilting link www.quilterscache.com I love that site!!
re overlockers depends really what you want them for..to cut,stitch and finish you need a 5 thread ,I only ever saw one domestic 5 thread think it was made by Janome?? A four thread will finish the edges but not give the seperate line of stitching next to it,a 3 thread will also just finish the edges.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Buttery: an old cotton sheet cut into squares would do as the backing fabric. I think traditionally a loose-weave muslin would be used. If you are thinking of hand sewing, then you don't want a fabric that is very tightly woven because that makes it quite hard work.

Sparklywellies: Even people who have been sewing for decades occasionally stitch themselves into their work - you are not alone!

ButteryHOLsomeness



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

would an old flannel sheet be ok? i like the weight and feel of them so they'd be nice to snuggle up against if i actually decided to 'use' the quilt

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you are going for the crazy quilt, then you will have two lots of backing. The first is the foundation blocks - the 12-inch squares that you sew the scraps of patterned fabric to. You will then sew these together to make a quilt top. When you have your quilt top sewn, you will then need to back it with a single piece of fabric to finish it off. Flannel would be great for this.
If you want to make a thicker quilt, you could also sandwich a piece of wadding or fleece between the two layers. I don't think it is essential for this type of quilt though.

This is great - you have inspired me to actually finish off the scrap quilt that I have been doing on and off for the last 3 years. I have now got enough scraps together to do the edges, so there is no excuse.

Home on the Hill



Joined: 06 Feb 2005
Posts: 313
Location: Warwickshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

At school I was taught that if your sewing machine starts playing up, before you adjust the tension etc. change the needle. It works for me! Also, I always use a new needle for each new project.

On the subject of quilting - I've made a couple. Anyone interested in a look should follow the www link below and then look in my sewing room

moogie



Joined: 02 Feb 2005
Posts: 525
Location: Near Bridgend
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My sewing machine died a while back and something I do to make extra money is make curtains for people. I couldn't afford a new machine but saw one of those tiny little portable ones for 15 in woolies. It doesn't have zigzag or anything else on it but I can knock up a fairly decent pair of curtains on them as quick as I used to on my expensive one and it can manage thick fabric ok. If you want something tostart on without forking out for one I'd really recommend it. Its good for mending things on too. I will be investing in a real one again soon but its definately great if you don't use one much.

nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5886
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just thought I would add, you can pick up those lovely old fashioned black Singer hand machines for about 20 on ebay or in charity shops. It won't be able to do many fancy things but they are lovely machines to use.

ButteryHOLsomeness



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 05 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i used to have one of them. well actually it was one of the first electric models they did in america. it was gorgeous and it still worked! had tons of bobbins, thread and needles with it still in it's cabinet and i got it for $12 at a yard sale that was 15 years ago but it was definately a bargain then...

i used several times but mostly it was there for looks. the woman that sold it to me was kind enough to tell me that when the rubber thingy (sorry i have a migraine) broke she just got one from a vacumn sales place that was the same size,it obviously worked because that was what was on the machine when i bought it, i thought that was very clever

sally_in_wales
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 20809
Location: sunny wales
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I went though a 'phase' in my teens of collecting and servicing those old sewing machines. One thing to be aware of is that they often do have a bit of wear and tear on the shuttle race, and sometimes no amount of new needles or oil in the world will get them sewing properly again. So, if you do start looking for an old hand cranked machine, amke sure you can try it out properly first.

Saying that, I still have several in my mothers attic that work fine, and would be pleased to see some of them rehomed. She's in Berkshire and I'm in South Wales, if anyone without a machine wants an old hand cranked one, let me know and we'll see what we can do about digging them out and getting them to a mutually sensible place for collection- probably too heavy to post effectively.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Home on the Hill wrote:
On the subject of quilting - I've made a couple. Anyone interested in a look should follow the www link below and then look in my sewing room


Lovely quilts HotHl. I really like the greens and blues in your daughter's one.

ButteryHOLsomeness



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Judith wrote:
Home on the Hill wrote:
On the subject of quilting - I've made a couple. Anyone interested in a look should follow the www link below and then look in my sewing room


Lovely quilts HotHl. I really like the greens and blues in your daughter's one.


i was quite impressed with the advent quilt, great idea and it's such gorgeous rich colours

ButteryHOLsomeness



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

grrrr ebay is so annoying i keep doing searchs for areas around edinburgh selling sewing machines, trying to get a deal on a local pickup only sale. tonight i set my search radius to within 75 miles of edinburgh and it didn't come up with anything useful.

so instead i type in janome just to get an idea of the prices and i find one going really cheap in dunfermline!!! why that didn't come up i don't know as it's fairly close! i used sewing machine as my search terms and also asked for it to search the text as well... it had sewing machine in the title

at any rate, i have put it on my watch list buti thought i'd cut and paste the details here and get everyone's opinions before i bid, it's only got 12 hours left so please make your suggestions fast!

JANOME NEW HOME 344 SEWING MACHINE!!!

Excellent working order....LOW RESERVE!!!!!

The Janome L-344 is also equipped with all the sewing features that every beginner sewer needs. Thirteen stitches include all the most commonly used utility stitches, including blind-hems, buttonholes, triple-strength stitches, and much more! Decorative stitches are included to add the finishing touches to a new dress, pillow, or other creative project. A free-arm feature allows sewing of pant-legs, collars, children's clothing, and any other kind of tubular fabric. A built-in carrying handle makes this machine portable for carrying back and forth to classes, and the built-in sewing light provides excellent illumination for easier threading and sewing. PLEASE NOTE MACHINE IN PICTURE IS AN EXAMPLE ONLY OF THE MACHINE FOR SALE


Features:

Easy Operation makes this an ideal machine for beginners!
13 Built-In Stitches
4 Step Automatic Buttonhole
Front-Loading Oscillating Bobbin System
Free-Arm Design
Built-In Carrying Handle
Built-In Sewing Light
7-Second Threading System
Drop-Feed System for Free-Motion Embroidery
Accessories Included: instruction manual, foot control, various bobbins etc

hils



Joined: 08 Mar 2005
Posts: 568
Location: Nottingham
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you're going to be sewing 'heavy stuff' like your quilts or curtains make sure your machine is heavy enough to stay on your table. I've got 2 machines one ancient Jones (the first one with a motor)-REALLY stupidly heavy but a really fab machine with loads of attatchments - but no zig zag great for big projects. And a singer featherlight which is really basic but great to whip out and do a quick alteration-with zig zag.

They are giving the old Jones machines away in my local paper!

ButteryHOLsomeness



Joined: 03 Apr 2005
Posts: 770

PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 05 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i just found another one that i like even better and dh was quite chuffed with it too, here's the description, think i'll probably go for this instead

Toyota free arm portable sewing machine.

With embroidery cams

Does zig-zag, buttonholes, twin needle sewing, overlocking and much more including embroidery.

Full instructions - spare bobbins and embrodery cams in case.

Machine is in good condition.



i'ts a nice looking machine

Home on the Hill



Joined: 06 Feb 2005
Posts: 313
Location: Warwickshire
PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 05 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Quote:
i was quite impressed with the advent quilt, great idea and it's such gorgeous rich colours


Thank-you all for your kind remarks but I must confess that the advent calendar is made from a kit bought at a sewing shop. It looks great but only took about an hour to put together. The real pain is finding enough small enough, cheap enough gifts to fill it with each year! We're not great sweet eaters so I try to be more imaginative!

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