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Gutting a chicken
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Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 10:39 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

It's good to check the liver & kidneys are healthy but their colour is a good indication of that. You don't need to do an autopsy.
If the birds are young & plucked warm I find that easier than skinning.
On the other hand if it's an old boiler without much meat. I tend to just pluck the legs & thighs & cut them off & skin & cut out the breast meat. For the time involved I personally don't think it's worth fussing over the wings & backs.
If you do this, no need to viscerate at all unless you want to for the gibblets etc.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

judith wrote:
It sounds as though you did fine, Cassy.

First, depending on the age of the bird, it can sometimes be difficult to get your hand inside as there isn't a lot of space. (Turkeys are great as there is a huge cavity, home-grown cockerels can be a very tight fit sometimes.)

Try doing quail!

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    


Jo S



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 5174
Location: Somerset
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have washed carcasses out after, well, spillages and not suffered any post-dinner consequences.

Quail, eh? And I thought Pekins and Silkies were a tight fit

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8433
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The food standards agency recommend that you dont wash poultry but as usual they have it wrong.

What they should do is tell you to clean up the kitchen properly after you have washed the bird & wash your hands & equipment.

Most issues with washing the bird is the water splashes that spread the risk not the actual washing or the bird. They are also talking about a "processed" bird that was done in a factory & was most likely dipped in some "muck" to kill the bugs any way.

If you have a totally clean board to work on & manage to do a clean job of the gutting then just a quick internal rinse is enough. Any "issues" then a full wash is warranted as they would be condemned in the factory if spotted.

I wash down between each bird & have very very hot water available to cleanse the tools.

cassy



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 1047
Location: South West Scotland
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks everybody, it sounds as if I didn't mess it up too badly then.

Chez wrote:
I thought we had an article about this, but the closest I can find is the one of pheasant:


That was really helpful, wish I'd thought to search there! It looks as if I identified the parts correctly.

judith wrote:
When you then go in at the bottom end, again as described, get your hand in as far as you can until you can feel the solid lump - the gizzard. Get a firm grip on that and pull gently and slowly. Everything should come out together. (Don't worry too much about the lungs - they tend to stay stuck to the carcase.)


Sounds good, it makes sense to grab a solid bit. John Seymour's method seemed to be pulling from the other end which is much more delicate.

judith wrote:
I always wash the bird inside and out after gutting, then wipe the entire surface down with bleachy water before starting the next bird to avoid any cross-contamination.


I wish I'd done that now, but I'll know next time, thanks! Do you dry the bird afterwards? Paper towel?

Tavascarow wrote:
Try doing quail!


Oi! Let me get the hang of chickens first!

Richard wrote:
What they should do is tell you to clean up the kitchen properly after you have washed the bird & wash your hands & equipment. ....... If you have a totally clean board to work on & manage to do a clean job of the gutting then just a quick internal rinse is enough. Any "issues" then a full wash is warranted as they would be condemned in the factory if spotted.


That sounds like a good system, thanks. I washed the tools and work surface with hot soapy water then scalded them, so the main things I did wrong were that I should have skinned them before gutting to keep the working area clean, I didn't clean down between birds and I should have rinsed them after gutting. I've got a glass chopping board I could have worked on, but not knowing what to expect, I worked on a washed plastic bag (I had the idea that things would spill all over the place ).

I think next time will be so much easier now I've got a better idea of a safe and clean working technique. Thanks!

Chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35907
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You've not lived until you've crushed a testicle by accident

cassy



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 1047
Location: South West Scotland
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think they must have been quite young (must remember to ask) as I didn't see equipment of either type. That will be something to "look forward to" next time .

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8433
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you are skinning & going to take all the meat off the bone dont even bother gutting them. But you will loose a portion of meat & the use of the carcus to make stock. The breast & legs come off easy peasy. After that its just a matter of careful filleting with a sharp knife to get as much meat off as you can. Handy for those times when you need to do a few at once & dont have enough freezer space.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35671
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

hung by the neck can be handy for both plucking and tidy gutting
clean is more important the longer one is going to store it and the more gently one cooks it ,i would be much more hygenic for bbq chook on monday rather than 3 day stew,

my experiances with road kill lead me to believe that there is a lot of paranoia about meat being "contaminated"
, in the world of commercial production im for good hygine regardless but i take responsibilty for my personal standards with my food and so the world misses out on the smoked bacon unless i jump lots of counter productive hoops

Last edited by dpack on Fri May 28, 10 3:48 pm; edited 1 time in total

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cassy wrote:
judith wrote:
I always wash the bird inside and out after gutting, then wipe the entire surface down with bleachy water before starting the next bird to avoid any cross-contamination.


I wish I'd done that now, but I'll know next time, thanks! Do you dry the bird afterwards? Paper towel?


Yes - I let it drain in the sink for a few minutes and then pat dry with paper towels. That helps to avoid the splashing that Richard mentions.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13510

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its easy to gut a chicken. Tell it that its a duck.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21298
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Chez wrote:
You've not lived until you've crushed a testicle by accident


Want do you call it when you do it deliberately? Exhilaration!

hardworkinghippy



Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 1110
Location: Bourrou South West France
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 10 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've a few photos like this one in Flickr :



Lovely eh ?

I'll update the set next time we do a few birds.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/hardworkinghippy/sets/72157594153914770/

cassy



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 1047
Location: South West Scotland
PostPosted: Mon May 31, 10 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

hardworkinghippy wrote:
I'll update the set next time we do a few birds.


Thank you, that would be great, if you've got a spare pair of hands !

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