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summer boleetus

 
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murdrobe



Joined: 03 Jun 2010
Posts: 189
Location: Blackburn, Lancashire
PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 10 8:17 pm    Post subject: summer boleetus  Reply with quote    

would it be the right time for those now? is it possible to find them in a garden?

my mum came and handed me a mushroom out of the garden yesterday. on 1st instincts i binned it. im not a knowledgeable forager so i wasnt going to take the risk right off like that but looking around there are more of them growing.

they have a brown cap, yellow spores underneath that turn blue when bruised. there is a large oak tree in the front garden so that fits aswel. im sorry i dont have a pic but it does look exactly like the picture in the "field guide to mushrooms" book.

is there anything i could easily confuse this with that would be harmful?

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34921
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 10 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I really think we need a photo. But it sounds hopeful.

bubble



Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 960

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 10 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

what size is it? [pores yellow turns blue when bruised ]could be bay bolete,it does'nt sound like a summer bolete [B. aestivalis]more info and piccies please.

Nick Rickerby



Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 10 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Could be red-cracking bolete, especially with the yellow pores turning blue.

Bay boletes a bit later in my experience, say mid-late August into October?

Photo please.

PeteS



Joined: 06 Dec 2006
Posts: 874
Location: Hampshire
PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 10 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick Rickerby wrote:
Could be red-cracking bolete, especially with the yellow pores turning blue.

Bay boletes a bit later in my experience, say mid-late August into October?

Photo please.


Generally yes, but I have found Ceps at the end of June (in 2007) and Bay Boletes mid-july (2009), so it could be any number of things.

bubble



Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 960

PostPosted: Fri Jul 16, 10 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

so have I,1st July 2007 found bay boletes at Santon Downham [thetford forest]and I agree with you Peter it could be anything.

Stewy



Joined: 17 Oct 2005
Posts: 1453
Location: Berkshire
PostPosted: Sat Jul 17, 10 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

PeteS wrote:
but I have found Ceps at the end of June (in 2007)


Talking of Ceps Pete, I know you like to keep records of weather patterns and such, any thoughts on how this coming season is shaping up?

murdrobe



Joined: 03 Jun 2010
Posts: 189
Location: Blackburn, Lancashire
PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 10 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

just been looking around, theres 2 that are burried up to the cap in the soil under my chamomile plant. will take a pic or 2 next time im out.

PeteS



Joined: 06 Dec 2006
Posts: 874
Location: Hampshire
PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 10 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Stewy wrote:
PeteS wrote:
but I have found Ceps at the end of June (in 2007)


Talking of Ceps Pete, I know you like to keep records of weather patterns and such, any thoughts on how this coming season is shaping up?


Hello Stewy, yes, I do like to do this. I believe that to get a good autumnal flush we need a nice dry and warm summer followed by rain in the late summer/autumn. I know that I'm not the only one that believes this. We also know that if we get a wet summer then the autumn (if it rains or not) is nearly always pants for fungi.

If you look at 2006 we had a very dry and hot summer. This was followed by rain at the end of August. There wasn't a lot of rain (it was just average) but the rain was consistant, without a real break and without a long dry spell. This lasted throughout the autumn and into the winter. As we know the autumn of 2006 was a great season.

This year we've (well down south at any rate) had little real rain since the beginning of April. June was the warmest and driest since 2006. July looks to be similar too. I believe that if it rains by the end of August and we get average to above average rainfall in the autumn, it'll be a great season.

The fungi that I'm seeing at the moment, for example: chanterelles, green cracking russula, chicken of the woods, oyster mushrooms, silky volvar... I normally see in mid-June. i.e. everything seems to be about a month late. Not sure if this means that the rest of the season will be late too.

bingo



Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 4401
Location: The Games Room normally!
PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 10 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

With you on that one Pete.



Alright Murdy.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34921
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 10 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good Lord, it's Bingo! Hello, how the hell are you?

bingo



Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 4401
Location: The Games Room normally!
PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 10 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm good, just popped in to say hello.

alison
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 12908
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 10 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

hi bingo, nice to see you again.

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