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Nettle infusion in syrup increases brood rearing.
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Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8407
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 11 12:47 pm    Post subject: Nettle infusion in syrup increases brood rearing.  Reply with quote    

The Effect of Plant Supplements on the Development of
Artificially Weaken Bee Families

Quote:
4. Conclusions

The purpose of the present research was to
determinate in the laboratory and in the field the
effect of different plant infusions and extracts on
honeybee colonies productivity. Studied
supplements were nettle (Urtica dioica), Protofil,
onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum),
thyme (Satureja hortensis), Echinacea (Echinacea
sp.). Experimental groups were build out of
artificially weaken bee colonies.
Laboratory determinations show different
polyphenolic content in the studied plants, which
were correlated with the field experiments
regarding the production of brood surface.
If we make a classification of the used
supplements, regarding the growth of brood
surface comparing to control groups, we can say
that nettle infusion induced the highest growth,
followed by Protofil, garlic, onion, Echinacea and
thyme.


About 25% more brood from what I read, making the syrup from an infusion of 100g of nettles in 1 litre of hot water.
Interesting.

blackcat



Joined: 30 Jun 2011
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 11 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Would it work with stinging nettle? I have heaps of that, and a bee colony that is only half way through winter and already down to syrup feeds due to having gone through their stores too quickly (it has been an erratic winter with warm sunny spells and hard cold spells, all terribly confusing to the bees).

Katieowl



Joined: 01 Jun 2006
Posts: 4317
Location: West Wales
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 11 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Ummm the Latin name of Thyme is Thymus Vulgaris?

Satureja hortensis is Summer Savory.

Kate

smokingdragon



Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Posts: 68
Location: Nr. Neath S.Wales
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 11 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for this post - made my first nettle infusion yesterday afternoon!!

Simon

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 11 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

blackcat wrote:
Would it work with stinging nettle? I have heaps of that, and a bee colony that is only half way through winter and already down to syrup feeds due to having gone through their stores too quickly (it has been an erratic winter with warm sunny spells and hard cold spells, all terribly confusing to the bees).


Urtica dioica is stinging nettle Linky

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11068

PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 11 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Don't know if this was carried out using a lot of colonies on each treatment, and if it has been repeated. Colony build up can be affected by a lot of things such as the queen, even how much sun there is on one site compared to the one next to it.

No harm in trying the infusion of nettles, but you may not get the same effect as the experiment. Be interested to hear if it works or not though.

blackcat



Joined: 30 Jun 2011
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 11 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Midland Spinner wrote:

Urtica dioica is stinging nettle Linky


Oh, thanks. It was called Urtica Urens when I was at school ... All this reclassification is annoying at times.

smokingdragon



Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Posts: 68
Location: Nr. Neath S.Wales
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 11 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bees seem to prefer it to the commercial additives - all feeders empty!!

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 11 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

blackcat wrote:
Midland Spinner wrote:

Urtica dioica is stinging nettle Linky


Oh, thanks. It was called Urtica Urens when I was at school ... All this reclassification is annoying at times.

Urtica urens is the annual stinging nettle.

But I agree that the reclassification is a pain in the wossname.
Most of my books are now out of date, as they were ones I used at uni.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34920
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 11 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Midland Spinner wrote:
blackcat wrote:
Midland Spinner wrote:

Urtica dioica is stinging nettle Linky


Oh, thanks. It was called Urtica Urens when I was at school ... All this reclassification is annoying at times.

Urtica urens is the annual stinging nettle.

But I agree that the reclassification is a pain in the wossname.
Most of my books are now out of date, as they were ones I used at uni.


Same here, but I can see the point. DNA technology has allowed us to see relationships much more accurately, and they can't say "Oh well, that was wrong, but we'd better leave it as it will annoy all those old fogeys who learned their taxonomy in the olden days."

My trouble is I now know both names, new and old, for some things but can't remember which is the up-to-date one.

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 11 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Jamanda wrote:
Midland Spinner wrote:
blackcat wrote:
Midland Spinner wrote:

Urtica dioica is stinging nettle Linky


Oh, thanks. It was called Urtica Urens when I was at school ... All this reclassification is annoying at times.

Urtica urens is the annual stinging nettle.

But I agree that the reclassification is a pain in the wossname.
Most of my books are now out of date, as they were ones I used at uni.


Same here, but I can see the point. DNA technology has allowed us to see relationships much more accurately, and they can't say "Oh well, that was wrong, but we'd better leave it as it will annoy all those old fogeys who learned their taxonomy in the olden days."

My trouble is I now know both names, new and old, for some things but can't remember which is the up-to-date one.


I didn't say that I don't agree with reclassification, I realise why the changes are made. And it's not just DNA technology that's enabled us to see relationships; taxonomical changes have been going on since Adam was a lad, with people realising that two people have classified the same thing, under two different names and having to revert to the older one - used to occur when someone was doing their Phd in a herbarium somewhere and came across a dusty old specimen that was collected back in 17someodd, putting it under a microscope and thinking "hmm, this looks very similar to......."

It's still a pain in the proverbial when you find that the expensive books you have on the shelf are now out of date and you can't afford to update them (and anyway the newer ones are not as well produced, well written or well illustrated as the ones you already have, it's just that they call Bluebells Endymion non-scripta instead of Scilla non-scripta, sorry Hyacynthoides non-scripta.)

smokingdragon



Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Posts: 68
Location: Nr. Neath S.Wales
PostPosted: Thu May 09, 13 8:48 pm    Post subject: Re: Nettle infusion in syrup increases brood rearing. Reply with quote    

Sorry for bringing up an old post but I find the nettle feed very effective and new keepers might want to try it!



Tavascarow wrote:
The Effect of Plant Supplements on the Development of
Artificially Weaken Bee Families

Quote:
4. Conclusions

The purpose of the present research was to
determinate in the laboratory and in the field the
effect of different plant infusions and extracts on
honeybee colonies productivity. Studied
supplements were nettle (Urtica dioica), Protofil,
onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum),
thyme (Satureja hortensis), Echinacea (Echinacea
sp.). Experimental groups were build out of
artificially weaken bee colonies.
Laboratory determinations show different
polyphenolic content in the studied plants, which
were correlated with the field experiments
regarding the production of brood surface.
If we make a classification of the used
supplements, regarding the growth of brood
surface comparing to control groups, we can say
that nettle infusion induced the highest growth,
followed by Protofil, garlic, onion, Echinacea and
thyme.


About 25% more brood from what I read, making the syrup from an infusion of 100g of nettles in 1 litre of hot water.
Interesting.

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Fri May 10, 13 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have been working with a beekeeper near Helston who is trying organic lemon juice (with no added preservatives etc) in sugar for varroa control. He checks his colonies with a board weekly.
Could be interesting.

Im also wanting to try icing sugar infused with a lot of lavender as a varroa treatment...wanted to try this this summer, but the huge colony I had in mind is no longer with me.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 11068

PostPosted: Fri May 10, 13 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Icing sugar on it's own might work just as well. As the bees pick up the sugar, the others groom them to remove it, which also removes the varroa.

We have not had time to do a lot with our bees the last few years, but some of the colonies seem to be coming through perfectly well without any varroa treatment or other manipulation. I do not recommend no treatment for varroa, but this raises a question; by looking at our bees all the time, do we actually do any harm? A point to discuss perhaps?

Interesting about the nettle infusion. I suppose in nature, the bees might pick up something from the nettle pollen.

In old books it suggests that bees also pick up nutrients/medication from urine. Any thoughts on this?

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 6514
Location: Dordogne
PostPosted: Fri May 10, 13 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Opening them up a lot does definately upset them, and disorientates them as we move frames etc around. This is the reasoning behind using top bar hives as you interfere less.
Personally, I think a lot depends on the beekeeper - you dont need to open the hive to see if the queen is laying - if the bees are taking in pollen then you know its for brood therefore you have a laying queen.
I dont open so much as Ive gained experience - I watch more, and i like the idea of the board - pulling out the board and checking this can indicate the colony growth (from the marks left on the board) or shrinkage (later in the year) also cappings from cells hatching, also varroa and anything else disturbing, eg signs of diarrhoea(I hate spelling this word).
Ive just been using a new beekeeper trainer down west and he is very good and into research - Ive learn so much just watching him with his bees.

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